11 Songs, 42 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With so many irons in the fire, it’s hard to imagine Imaad Wasif having any time to record on his own. Before joining the Yeah Yeah Yeahs as a touring guitarist, he'd lent his six-string skills to Lou Barlow's New Folk Implosion, Alaska!, and Lowercase. Where his 2006 eponymous solo debut garnered many justified comparisons to Elliott Smith and Jeff Buckley, his second studio album, The Voidist, reveals a young man finding his footing and his voice. From the psychedelic drone of the opening “Redeemer” to the minimalist closing mantra “Razorlike,” Wasif’s acoustic guitar chimes in the periphery as he pumps an electric guitar through some sludgy distortion. (This makes for an apt shift from Kill Rock Stars to the fuzz-friendly Tee Pee Records.) “Fangs” strikes a perfect balance between acoustic arpeggios that recall Led Zeppelin’s gentler moments and a deep rumbling distortion that’s immediately reminiscent of Black Sabbath and its disciples. As Wasif’s voice teeters between tenor and falsetto, songs like the kaleidoscopic folk of “Widow Wing” find him crooning deep into his confessional mind.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With so many irons in the fire, it’s hard to imagine Imaad Wasif having any time to record on his own. Before joining the Yeah Yeah Yeahs as a touring guitarist, he'd lent his six-string skills to Lou Barlow's New Folk Implosion, Alaska!, and Lowercase. Where his 2006 eponymous solo debut garnered many justified comparisons to Elliott Smith and Jeff Buckley, his second studio album, The Voidist, reveals a young man finding his footing and his voice. From the psychedelic drone of the opening “Redeemer” to the minimalist closing mantra “Razorlike,” Wasif’s acoustic guitar chimes in the periphery as he pumps an electric guitar through some sludgy distortion. (This makes for an apt shift from Kill Rock Stars to the fuzz-friendly Tee Pee Records.) “Fangs” strikes a perfect balance between acoustic arpeggios that recall Led Zeppelin’s gentler moments and a deep rumbling distortion that’s immediately reminiscent of Black Sabbath and its disciples. As Wasif’s voice teeters between tenor and falsetto, songs like the kaleidoscopic folk of “Widow Wing” find him crooning deep into his confessional mind.

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