15 Songs, 1 Hour 18 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Recorded during the band’s waning days, and not released until after its break-up, Recurring is one of rock music’s greatest records of divorce. While Perfect Prescriptions and Playing With Fire had been largely successful in integrating the divergent styles of Sonic Boom and J. Spaceman, Recurring finalized the divide between the two partners by giving them each a separate side of vinyl. Sonic Boom (Pete Kember), side one; J. Spacemen (Jason Pierce), side two. Yet, considering that each musician wrote and produced his side independent of the other, Recurring is remarkably unified. Kember songs like “Just to See You Smile” and “Set Me Free” bear the influence of Pierce’s altitudinal gospel, while a cover of Mudhoney’s “When Tomorrow Hits” (the only track on which both Kember and Pierce appear) displays the band’s shared love for downwardly spiraling distortion. With Spiritualized, Pierce embarked on the more ambitious and fulfilling post-Spacemen career, but on Recurring Kember is the bolder artist. His “Big City” is a hypnotic excursion into acid house, while “I Love You” transforms Bob Marley’s skank into blissful Spacemen groove.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Recorded during the band’s waning days, and not released until after its break-up, Recurring is one of rock music’s greatest records of divorce. While Perfect Prescriptions and Playing With Fire had been largely successful in integrating the divergent styles of Sonic Boom and J. Spaceman, Recurring finalized the divide between the two partners by giving them each a separate side of vinyl. Sonic Boom (Pete Kember), side one; J. Spacemen (Jason Pierce), side two. Yet, considering that each musician wrote and produced his side independent of the other, Recurring is remarkably unified. Kember songs like “Just to See You Smile” and “Set Me Free” bear the influence of Pierce’s altitudinal gospel, while a cover of Mudhoney’s “When Tomorrow Hits” (the only track on which both Kember and Pierce appear) displays the band’s shared love for downwardly spiraling distortion. With Spiritualized, Pierce embarked on the more ambitious and fulfilling post-Spacemen career, but on Recurring Kember is the bolder artist. His “Big City” is a hypnotic excursion into acid house, while “I Love You” transforms Bob Marley’s skank into blissful Spacemen groove.

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