15 Songs, 53 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Once upon a time, actor Jason Schwartzman was Phantom Planet’s drummer. Also, once upon a time, Phantom Planet dabbled in various shades of sunny pop rock, edgy garage revival rock, and plain old ‘mersh rock with a slight alt-leaning... but, always, the band had a flair for the ballad, for songs the girls love, and even songs that find their way onto TV shows like “The O.C.” On Raise the Dead, the band’s fourth studio album, the L.A. rockers have found their sound, and it was right there all the time, right under their shag-cut bangs. Choppy, angled rhythms and textured, evocative vocals meet up with pop hooks and rock arrangements both contemporary and vintage; storytelling is flavored with a healthy balance of yearning and caustic worldliness; and an exuberant, almost manic energy manages to flow and breathe at the appropriate moments. The joyful, retro feel of “Leave Yourself for Somebody Else,” the staccato vocals and springy vigor of “Dropped,” and the bah-bah-bah chorus of the re-worked “Do the Panic” should please fans no end, but the real stars — the Byrne-ish “Raise the Dead,” the staggering force of “Geronimo,” and the Brit-inflected “Ship Lost at Sea” — should make non-fans sit up and take notice as well.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Once upon a time, actor Jason Schwartzman was Phantom Planet’s drummer. Also, once upon a time, Phantom Planet dabbled in various shades of sunny pop rock, edgy garage revival rock, and plain old ‘mersh rock with a slight alt-leaning... but, always, the band had a flair for the ballad, for songs the girls love, and even songs that find their way onto TV shows like “The O.C.” On Raise the Dead, the band’s fourth studio album, the L.A. rockers have found their sound, and it was right there all the time, right under their shag-cut bangs. Choppy, angled rhythms and textured, evocative vocals meet up with pop hooks and rock arrangements both contemporary and vintage; storytelling is flavored with a healthy balance of yearning and caustic worldliness; and an exuberant, almost manic energy manages to flow and breathe at the appropriate moments. The joyful, retro feel of “Leave Yourself for Somebody Else,” the staccato vocals and springy vigor of “Dropped,” and the bah-bah-bah chorus of the re-worked “Do the Panic” should please fans no end, but the real stars — the Byrne-ish “Raise the Dead,” the staggering force of “Geronimo,” and the Brit-inflected “Ship Lost at Sea” — should make non-fans sit up and take notice as well.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
150 Ratings

150 Ratings

silkrevolver ,

Maybe the best album....ever

This is alternative music at it's best. It has a unified theme of cults (the creepy kind, not horses) and it is an emotional hey-ride. It kicks off with the title song "raise the dead" wich is very arcade fire-esque, but has the Phantom Planet umph. Then there is "Dropped" so catchy, so great. "Leader" a happy go lucky (but ironic) song about a cult leader, with children back-up singers. "Do the Panic" has critical suscess writen all over it. "Quarantine", sad, mellow, not emo...so good. "Ship lost at sea" my favorite, with bass clarinet. "Demon Daughters" like Radiohead, but better! "Geronimo" I don't know if I'm allowed to write what it's about. "too much too often" its about Partying too much (too often!) "Confess" orchestral-rock masterpice. "Leave yourself for sombody else" A happy ending. "I don't mind" so mellow and finishes off the initial album perfectly. "Ivory daggers" awesome myth themed anthem. "from this day on" love song. "What you want" maybe a better ending then I don't mind
BUY THIS ALBUM

ericsaber ,

The evolution of a band

This is my first review on iTunes, but I've been eagerly awaiting this album and I just received my pre-order, so I thought why not chime in. I actually heard it already in its entirety streaming on their myspace page this week (except for the bonus tracks). I've got to say it's a great album. Some of the songs show a tremendous leap forward in the maturity of the songwriting. This is a band that is willing to take risks, which was evident when they threw out the power-pop formula of previous albums on their self-titled 2004 album. Although I enjoyed that album too, this one works more immediately, and I think it's more cohesive, figuratively and literally (many songs are gapless and flow into each other). It's really a great fusion of 2002's The Guest (with it's more memorable hooks), and some of the rougher edges and experimentation of 2004's Phantom Planet. I've enjoyed this band since before they were known for "California" and The O.C., and while I still think that song is great, this album shows a band really hitting its prime and truly maturing. Worth every penny and I can't wait to see where they go from here.

Tracks not to miss: Raise the Dead, Dropped, Geronimo, Confess, Leave Yourself for Somebody Else.

JoshLecash ,

YEEEES

Best Phantom Planet album and I still love their last one. If you are going to buy one thing today it should be this and if you are going to buy two things the second should be waffles.

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