31 Songs, 2 Hours 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Rage Against the Machine's eponymous 1992 debut album successfully blended rap and metal with binding elements of punk and funk. But what garnered attention even more than the band's impressive musical hybrid was frontman Zack de la Rocha’s politically charged lyrics; he lambasted oppressive governments, American corporations, and cultural imperialism. In addition to a fidelity remaster, the 2012 anniversary reissue boasts an extra 21 tracks, including three live songs, 12 previously unreleased demos, and six videos. The live recording of “Bombtrack” starts with de la Rocha telling a Minnesota audience about Leonard Peltier’s plight before guitarist Tom Morello invokes a sonic storm. De la Rocha, Morello, and the rest of the band step it up on the live version of the anti-everything anthem “Bullet in the Head,” with echoes of audience participation in the periphery. “Take the Power Back” best exemplifies the rhythm section’s allegiance to '70s funk. Of the demos, “Bullet in the Head” homes in on Tim Bob’s bass skills as he segues through root-note pedaling, harmonic melodies, and fretboard slapping.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Rage Against the Machine's eponymous 1992 debut album successfully blended rap and metal with binding elements of punk and funk. But what garnered attention even more than the band's impressive musical hybrid was frontman Zack de la Rocha’s politically charged lyrics; he lambasted oppressive governments, American corporations, and cultural imperialism. In addition to a fidelity remaster, the 2012 anniversary reissue boasts an extra 21 tracks, including three live songs, 12 previously unreleased demos, and six videos. The live recording of “Bombtrack” starts with de la Rocha telling a Minnesota audience about Leonard Peltier’s plight before guitarist Tom Morello invokes a sonic storm. De la Rocha, Morello, and the rest of the band step it up on the live version of the anti-everything anthem “Bullet in the Head,” with echoes of audience participation in the periphery. “Take the Power Back” best exemplifies the rhythm section’s allegiance to '70s funk. Of the demos, “Bullet in the Head” homes in on Tim Bob’s bass skills as he segues through root-note pedaling, harmonic melodies, and fretboard slapping.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
160 Ratings

160 Ratings

Mickey Fingers ,

Rage FOREVER

Rage was the BEST LIVE show I've EVER seen. They don't make 'em like this anymore. (PERIOD)

DIVEMASTERMASON ,

A powerful message...

This album needs no introduction...

Truly is one of the greatest albums I have ever heard. As a young teenager..I remember listening to this album frequently. At the time it was extremely influential. This was back before the days when "Bulls on Parade" hit the scene. RATM were still something of an underground band. A powerful message that caused myself (and peers at the time) to research/read about topics discussed within the album. I am not sure any other album has had that affect.

To me the album is a 10. No bad songs on the entire record.

The album cover, lyrical content and theme were all abrasive. A perfect mix for a young mind and a pair of cheap headphones..

It captivated my attention then.. and twenty years later it still does... It still holds a special place.

An alarm that doesn't go off ,

Release Live and Rare already!!!!

This album while offering some demo tracks doesn't really introduce listeners to anything new and as such really doesn't merit it any new reviews. Live and Rare is a must-have Rage album that's curiously missing from iTunes. Why?

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