15 Songs, 54 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Quebec was the result of hundreds of hours of writing and jamming that Gene and Dean Ween did with various session musicians after leaving Elektra in 2000. Working primarily out of the New Jersey studio of longtime collaborator Andrew Weiss (who not only produced and mixed the album but contributes keyboards and vocals to several songs), the band uncovered a new maturity level. That’s not to say its famously shaggy sense of humor didn’t remain intact—just check “Hey There Fancypants” for proof—but Quebec feels less frantic and less emotionally evasive than the old albums. There are big bad rock songs (“It’s Gonna Be a Long Night,” “Transdermal Celebration”) and miniature oddities in the vein of classic Ween (“Zoloft,” “So Many People in the Neighborhood”). But the album is defined by the half-folksy, half-spacy warmth of “Chocolate Town,” “Among His Tribe," and “If You Could Save Yourself (You’d Save Us All).” Gentleness and balminess aren't typically seen as innovative traits, but in the context of Ween—a band at one time renowned for its acid-soaked musical tantrums—Quebec's soft touch feels like new ground.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Quebec was the result of hundreds of hours of writing and jamming that Gene and Dean Ween did with various session musicians after leaving Elektra in 2000. Working primarily out of the New Jersey studio of longtime collaborator Andrew Weiss (who not only produced and mixed the album but contributes keyboards and vocals to several songs), the band uncovered a new maturity level. That’s not to say its famously shaggy sense of humor didn’t remain intact—just check “Hey There Fancypants” for proof—but Quebec feels less frantic and less emotionally evasive than the old albums. There are big bad rock songs (“It’s Gonna Be a Long Night,” “Transdermal Celebration”) and miniature oddities in the vein of classic Ween (“Zoloft,” “So Many People in the Neighborhood”). But the album is defined by the half-folksy, half-spacy warmth of “Chocolate Town,” “Among His Tribe," and “If You Could Save Yourself (You’d Save Us All).” Gentleness and balminess aren't typically seen as innovative traits, but in the context of Ween—a band at one time renowned for its acid-soaked musical tantrums—Quebec's soft touch feels like new ground.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
39 Ratings

39 Ratings

Toother ,

Yeah

One of their best. It's a journey of mania and desperation. Beautifully told and elegant in nature. If you're a fan of explorative music jump in, the waters fine.

Funkymonk81 ,

Concept album!

This album doesn't directly tell a story, but it does follow a protagonist moving to a new town (perhaps Quebec) to flee the pain of a failing relationship, trying to fill the void with drugs and tentatively searching for new friends. A few attempts to rekindle the flame are made by each party of the break up, but the protagonist ultimately finds clarity in moving on.

Some of it is kind of depressing, but the overall message is one of hope. If you have ever had your heart broken and moved on, you will understand this album. Very underrated. The Argus, man...the Argus!!!

jaychu ,

not a fan

i respect their style and off ball ways- but i can't honestly stomach listenin through an entire album of theirs. Many of my friends are good fans. What I do like are some of the songs that show great crafted pop melodies ['tried and true' for one] with their strange humor left intact.

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