20 Songs, 1 Hour 13 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Originally inspired by the rhythms and tones of electro, Sean Booth and Rob Brown formed Autechre in Sheffield, England at the dawn of the ‘90s. The duo went on to release work that became increasingly experimental, and for a while they were seen as the cutting edge of the genre known as IDM. On the 2008 release, Quaristice, Autechre presents 20 tracks that range far and wide. The opener, “Altibzz,” is 2:52 of swooony mellowness while “The Plc” percolates in ways that Autechre fans will immediately recognize. “IO” splats and chugs as we hear distorted vocal fragments that reduce language to sound effects. “Paralel Suns,” which might be the scariest thing here, evokes a sense of last-man-on-the-planet desolation. “Fol3” flirts with musique concrète; are the audio sources slamming doors and shuffling feet? “90101-5I-I” comes off like techno made by a drunken robot or some other addled machine. After all the sonic wandering, Quaristice ends deliciously with the mysterious “Outh9X,” the album’s longest cut. It’s a spacious, compelling piece that shows the group is still interested in exploring new turf.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Originally inspired by the rhythms and tones of electro, Sean Booth and Rob Brown formed Autechre in Sheffield, England at the dawn of the ‘90s. The duo went on to release work that became increasingly experimental, and for a while they were seen as the cutting edge of the genre known as IDM. On the 2008 release, Quaristice, Autechre presents 20 tracks that range far and wide. The opener, “Altibzz,” is 2:52 of swooony mellowness while “The Plc” percolates in ways that Autechre fans will immediately recognize. “IO” splats and chugs as we hear distorted vocal fragments that reduce language to sound effects. “Paralel Suns,” which might be the scariest thing here, evokes a sense of last-man-on-the-planet desolation. “Fol3” flirts with musique concrète; are the audio sources slamming doors and shuffling feet? “90101-5I-I” comes off like techno made by a drunken robot or some other addled machine. After all the sonic wandering, Quaristice ends deliciously with the mysterious “Outh9X,” the album’s longest cut. It’s a spacious, compelling piece that shows the group is still interested in exploring new turf.

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