10 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though "Wax Face" opens Putrifiers II with the mind-melting ferocity that so intoxicated fans on past T.O.S. tunes, the album as a whole is a white-hot brew of everything the supreme psych-rockers do best. If one could distill their two 2011 releases into one edited, cohesive whole—or perhaps distill their entire vast catalog into such a thing—it would come awfully close to Putrifiers II. There are strings and woodwinds among other instrumental delights here; we love the droning cello and violins on the Velvets-ish "So Nice." There are also mind-melters ("Lupine Dominus" snaps and growls with appropriately feral organs and guitar) and artfully sculpted bad-trip soundtrack music ("Clouds #1"). Plus, there are almost-breezy psych-pop tunes with summery strings ("Goodnight Baby"), as well as sweetly '60s-style vocal harmonies and crisp, just-before-the-red production ("Flood's New Light," "Hang a Picture"). Thee Oh Sees even toss in funhouse-mirror doo-wop ("Will We Be Scared?") and dew-kissed baroque pop ("Wicked Pop"). John Dwyer and his merry band continue evolving before our very eyes, and that is, literally, awesome.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Though "Wax Face" opens Putrifiers II with the mind-melting ferocity that so intoxicated fans on past T.O.S. tunes, the album as a whole is a white-hot brew of everything the supreme psych-rockers do best. If one could distill their two 2011 releases into one edited, cohesive whole—or perhaps distill their entire vast catalog into such a thing—it would come awfully close to Putrifiers II. There are strings and woodwinds among other instrumental delights here; we love the droning cello and violins on the Velvets-ish "So Nice." There are also mind-melters ("Lupine Dominus" snaps and growls with appropriately feral organs and guitar) and artfully sculpted bad-trip soundtrack music ("Clouds #1"). Plus, there are almost-breezy psych-pop tunes with summery strings ("Goodnight Baby"), as well as sweetly '60s-style vocal harmonies and crisp, just-before-the-red production ("Flood's New Light," "Hang a Picture"). Thee Oh Sees even toss in funhouse-mirror doo-wop ("Will We Be Scared?") and dew-kissed baroque pop ("Wicked Pop"). John Dwyer and his merry band continue evolving before our very eyes, and that is, literally, awesome.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.6 out of 5
25 Ratings

25 Ratings

oh•vell ,

Putrifiers II II II II

It's hard to imagine how they can keep this up. Where does the inspiration come from? It's like aliens are beaming information to them to be translated into the fiercest, most expertly-executed Psychedelic garage fuzz ever created. It seemed like Carrion Crawler was their finest work to date, but with things like this, I just don't know what to think anymore. Help & Master's Bedroom & Warm Slime are still obviously contenders. Or hey, maybe you're a weirdo and enjoy Dog Poison or Castlemania the most. It doesn't matter. And that's what's great about this band. They'll just keep on producing and playing until their limbs shrivel and decay. And it will all be good.
This one has the damaged-folk indications of their earlier days, the driving-Krautrock tendencies of more recent times, and a whole slew of other things that somehow makes Putrifiers different from the rest of their catalogue, but still intrinsically linked with it.
They're all separate pieces of the same lysergic puzzle. Just don't play with it too long - or you might absorb something you can't handle.
If you're a real Oh Sees fan, you'll probably understand every word of that review -- and agree with most of them.

quantum28 ,

Brilliant !

Great Production ! Even a Syd Barret ish number on track 10 . Lovely !!!

music_enthusiast! ,

Fantastic.

“Wax Face” and “Hang a Picture” alone are worth the price of admission. Buy this album.

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