12 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Horrors pretty much exemplify the evolution of goth in the new millennium. Though the goth tag may retain its grip due only to Faris Badwan’s evocative voice — which actually sounds like a cave, if caves could sing — it’s hard to imagine the band’s ancestral influences (the Cramps, Joy Division, Birthday Party, etc.) fading away completely. Toning down the noisier, punkier elements of their debut Strange House, Primary Colours is a surprisingly ... lovely record: “I Only Think of You” has the gravitas of Stephin Merritt (of Magnetic Fields) at his most melancholy; the Krautrock-kissed “Sea Within a Sea” is atmospheric and lulling; the shoegaze storm underlying “Mirror’s Image” and the Joe Meek influenced “Who Can Say” is warmly familiar and hypnotic. The lush orchestration and Badwan’s vocals on “Three Decades” recalls the Psychedelic Furs, while “New Ice Age” feels like a PiL/Sonic Youth mash-up. These Brit boys boldly embrace the past — all the while writing good songs, an important point here — and their future looks bright.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Horrors pretty much exemplify the evolution of goth in the new millennium. Though the goth tag may retain its grip due only to Faris Badwan’s evocative voice — which actually sounds like a cave, if caves could sing — it’s hard to imagine the band’s ancestral influences (the Cramps, Joy Division, Birthday Party, etc.) fading away completely. Toning down the noisier, punkier elements of their debut Strange House, Primary Colours is a surprisingly ... lovely record: “I Only Think of You” has the gravitas of Stephin Merritt (of Magnetic Fields) at his most melancholy; the Krautrock-kissed “Sea Within a Sea” is atmospheric and lulling; the shoegaze storm underlying “Mirror’s Image” and the Joe Meek influenced “Who Can Say” is warmly familiar and hypnotic. The lush orchestration and Badwan’s vocals on “Three Decades” recalls the Psychedelic Furs, while “New Ice Age” feels like a PiL/Sonic Youth mash-up. These Brit boys boldly embrace the past — all the while writing good songs, an important point here — and their future looks bright.

TITLE TIME
12

Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
144 Ratings

144 Ratings

ballarde ,

breathtaking

how are the horrors this impeccably versatile?! from the manic-agony of Strange House to this... this epic, tortured piece of work. i'm astonished. confused. and thrilled. the horrors just might save rock & roll...

yeslukas ,

What the Hell Happened?

The Horrors - an English quintet, notable for wearing circulation-inhibiting black jeans and too much makeup; a band whose member’s names range from Spider Webb to Coffin Joe.
Strange House - The Horror’s debut album that was once labeled Zombie Garage Punk; an album that appealed to a very small demographic group of estranged Goth kids; an album that featured lead singer Faris Badwan screaming incoherently in a manner that was only marginally decipherable to the untrained ear.
Yes the gothic, vampire shtick was entertaining, but nobody expected them to go anywhere.
And now, 2 years later, The Horrors have released their sophomore album, Primary Colours.
A band that was once known for spitting on their audience during shows, are now being dubbed the saviors of Rock n’ Roll.

The sound of Primary Colours is so different to The Horror’s first attempt at music that many fans are asking the simple question, “What the hell happened?” Did the band really experience such drastic changes in their lives that they decided to change their sound completely? Or did The Horror’s have it in them the whole time, and have just been eluding the public with their morbid image. Or is this simply proof that The Horror’s are a lot more talented and multi-faceted then we were led to believe. Whatever metamorphism the band experienced it certainly has helped them reach out to a much wider audience and will inevitably result in an increase of record sales and commercial success.

Primary Colours has an amalgamation of different shoegaze and post-punk influences.
My Bloody Valentine, The Jesus and Mary Chain and even The Cure are just a few of the bands that The Horrors pay homage to.

From ethereal atmospheric melodies, to front man Faris Badwan’s indolent yet passionate tone, Primary Colours explores new musical territory, whilst keeping The Horror’s signature deathly undertone alive.

theneonhorror ,

I Can't Control Myself!!

I didn't have to wait 'til May 4th for this??? wow..

anyway, on to the review:
It's a wonder to think that Faris can do things other than scream into a mic!! haha

Overall, I like what I'm feeling with this album. First, know that it takes a few listens to get under your belts! It's complex.

The Horrors, my friends, have grown.

I fell in love with them for their harsh first record Strange House, but it seems that I'm still grooving along to Primary Colours just the same. Slightly electronic and simplistic feel that I definitely did not expect from them, yet the piercing guitar still seems to be present. Also, their rustic punk feel has held solid.

Let's face it, if they had stuck to the same style, we would've put them away as sophomore slump material. Put this stuff next to their old material, and it's a full spectrum of perfection.

listen to tracks: Sea Within a Sea, Mirror's Image, I Can't Control Myself, Scarlet Fields, and Who Can Say.
(well, that's almost the whole album isn't it? exactly.)

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