12 Songs, 57 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Horrors pretty much exemplify the evolution of goth in the new millennium. Though the goth tag may retain its grip due only to Faris Badwan’s evocative voice — which actually sounds like a cave, if caves could sing — it’s hard to imagine the band’s ancestral influences (the Cramps, Joy Division, Birthday Party, etc.) fading away completely. Toning down the noisier, punkier elements of their debut Strange House, Primary Colours is a surprisingly ... lovely record: “I Only Think of You” has the gravitas of Stephin Merritt (of Magnetic Fields) at his most melancholy; the Krautrock-kissed “Sea Within a Sea” is atmospheric and lulling; the shoegaze storm underlying “Mirror’s Image” and the Joe Meek influenced “Who Can Say” is warmly familiar and hypnotic. The lush orchestration and Badwan’s vocals on “Three Decades” recalls the Psychedelic Furs, while “New Ice Age” feels like a PiL/Sonic Youth mash-up. These Brit boys boldly embrace the past — all the while writing good songs, an important point here — and their future looks bright.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Horrors pretty much exemplify the evolution of goth in the new millennium. Though the goth tag may retain its grip due only to Faris Badwan’s evocative voice — which actually sounds like a cave, if caves could sing — it’s hard to imagine the band’s ancestral influences (the Cramps, Joy Division, Birthday Party, etc.) fading away completely. Toning down the noisier, punkier elements of their debut Strange House, Primary Colours is a surprisingly ... lovely record: “I Only Think of You” has the gravitas of Stephin Merritt (of Magnetic Fields) at his most melancholy; the Krautrock-kissed “Sea Within a Sea” is atmospheric and lulling; the shoegaze storm underlying “Mirror’s Image” and the Joe Meek influenced “Who Can Say” is warmly familiar and hypnotic. The lush orchestration and Badwan’s vocals on “Three Decades” recalls the Psychedelic Furs, while “New Ice Age” feels like a PiL/Sonic Youth mash-up. These Brit boys boldly embrace the past — all the while writing good songs, an important point here — and their future looks bright.

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12

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