11 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Smiths’ self-titled debut was an astonishingly fresh approach to guitar-based pop in the mid-1980s. The British quartet worked as a fully functioning unit with each member bringing an economy of style. Johnny Marr’s swirling, arpeggiated pickings supplied an attractive jangle and provided a savvy counterpoint to the band’s unconventional lead singer, Steven Patrick Morrissey. Morrissey’s clever and emotionally naked lyrics probed and poked into confrontational topics ranging from homosexuality to the pains of child abuse. The album contains many Smiths classics, from “This Charming Man,” with its indelible pop hook to the screaming absurdity of “Miserable Lie” where Morrissey becomes unhinged in playful torment. “What Difference Does It Make?” establishes Morrissey’s rhetorical side, while “Pretty Girls Make Graves” and “You’ve Got Everything Now” address the envy and angst of youth to stunning effect. Morrissey’s sense of a world gone wrong can be heard as empathy (“Suffer Little Children,” “Still Ill”) or as indignation (“I Don’t Owe You Anything”) — all told, a brilliant debut album from a band destined for glory.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Smiths’ self-titled debut was an astonishingly fresh approach to guitar-based pop in the mid-1980s. The British quartet worked as a fully functioning unit with each member bringing an economy of style. Johnny Marr’s swirling, arpeggiated pickings supplied an attractive jangle and provided a savvy counterpoint to the band’s unconventional lead singer, Steven Patrick Morrissey. Morrissey’s clever and emotionally naked lyrics probed and poked into confrontational topics ranging from homosexuality to the pains of child abuse. The album contains many Smiths classics, from “This Charming Man,” with its indelible pop hook to the screaming absurdity of “Miserable Lie” where Morrissey becomes unhinged in playful torment. “What Difference Does It Make?” establishes Morrissey’s rhetorical side, while “Pretty Girls Make Graves” and “You’ve Got Everything Now” address the envy and angst of youth to stunning effect. Morrissey’s sense of a world gone wrong can be heard as empathy (“Suffer Little Children,” “Still Ill”) or as indignation (“I Don’t Owe You Anything”) — all told, a brilliant debut album from a band destined for glory.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
47 Ratings

47 Ratings

Nj_bookgirl79 ,

Stop 'Remastering'

Itunes needs to stop remastering classic albums. Seriously. The "remastered" version of This Charming Man, sounds nothing like the original. The tempo way too fast and over produced. Release the original version please.

Cap'n Kirch ,

Good debut

I've always had a love-hate relationship with this album. I understand the historic significance of this album, and much of it is first-rate music, but there's an overall melancholy feel to this album that I find off-putting at times. Really, if you want to understand what the Smiths were all about when they first arrived on the scene, pick up Hatful of Hollow. That's a far better representation of this band at this point in time.

Chloe Stargazer ,

Totally amazing

The Smiths are great, and Morrissey is hilariously melodramatic. Totally awesome stuff!

More By The Smiths

You May Also Like