13 Songs, 51 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

On its sophomore album, The Welcome Wagon moves out of the shadow of mentor Sufjan Stevens to assert a more fully realized musical identity. Vito Aiuto (pastor at Brooklyn’s Resurrection Presbyterian Church) and wife Monique fashion an appealing sound out of traditional hymns, vintage country rock, and contemporary folk elements. At times, Precious Remedies… recalls the naïve spirit of such early Jesus Music artists as 2nd Chapter of Acts and Lazarus; tracks like “I’m Not Fine,” “Rice & Beans (But No Beans)," and “God Be with You Til We Meet Again” have a guileless charm, underscored by the Aiutos’ humble but earnest vocals. Within its acoustic-oriented perimeters, The Welcome Wagon takes creative risks that pay off handsomely. The Cure’s “High” is turned into a homespun ode to conjugal love, while an inspired reworking of the David Crowder Band’s “Remedy” takes the popular worship number into old-time folk terrain. The most affecting track is “Would You Come & See Me in New York,” a poignant ballad sung by Vito in honor of his late father.

EDITORS’ NOTES

On its sophomore album, The Welcome Wagon moves out of the shadow of mentor Sufjan Stevens to assert a more fully realized musical identity. Vito Aiuto (pastor at Brooklyn’s Resurrection Presbyterian Church) and wife Monique fashion an appealing sound out of traditional hymns, vintage country rock, and contemporary folk elements. At times, Precious Remedies… recalls the naïve spirit of such early Jesus Music artists as 2nd Chapter of Acts and Lazarus; tracks like “I’m Not Fine,” “Rice & Beans (But No Beans)," and “God Be with You Til We Meet Again” have a guileless charm, underscored by the Aiutos’ humble but earnest vocals. Within its acoustic-oriented perimeters, The Welcome Wagon takes creative risks that pay off handsomely. The Cure’s “High” is turned into a homespun ode to conjugal love, while an inspired reworking of the David Crowder Band’s “Remedy” takes the popular worship number into old-time folk terrain. The most affecting track is “Would You Come & See Me in New York,” a poignant ballad sung by Vito in honor of his late father.

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