12 Songs, 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Known for being the first band signed to Beggars Banquet Records in 1978, the London punk trio The Lurkers offer up a generous two-fer with 1989’s King of the Mountain and 1990’s Powerjive. The latter album’s title track opens with confectionary pop-punk akin to The Buzzcocks or Toy Dolls. “Lipstick and Shampoo” contrasts British-flavored power pop similar to The Jam with lyrics that have more in common with the tongue-in-cheek teenage themes of American power pop like Milk N’ Cookies. “Waiting for You” similarly contrasts tough U.K. punk with amorous lyrics before “Things Will Never Be the Same” harks back to the band’s rudimentary ‘70s beginnings with power chords and gang vocals. The anomalous ballad “The World of Jenny Brown” is the first song here to sound like it's from the late ‘80s or early ‘90s, with its new wave synthesizers and mechanical-sounding drums. Fans of mid-‘90s Britpop might zero in on “Go Go Girl,” which sounds like an intersection between Modern Life Is Rubbish–era Blur and Supergrass’ debut album.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Known for being the first band signed to Beggars Banquet Records in 1978, the London punk trio The Lurkers offer up a generous two-fer with 1989’s King of the Mountain and 1990’s Powerjive. The latter album’s title track opens with confectionary pop-punk akin to The Buzzcocks or Toy Dolls. “Lipstick and Shampoo” contrasts British-flavored power pop similar to The Jam with lyrics that have more in common with the tongue-in-cheek teenage themes of American power pop like Milk N’ Cookies. “Waiting for You” similarly contrasts tough U.K. punk with amorous lyrics before “Things Will Never Be the Same” harks back to the band’s rudimentary ‘70s beginnings with power chords and gang vocals. The anomalous ballad “The World of Jenny Brown” is the first song here to sound like it's from the late ‘80s or early ‘90s, with its new wave synthesizers and mechanical-sounding drums. Fans of mid-‘90s Britpop might zero in on “Go Go Girl,” which sounds like an intersection between Modern Life Is Rubbish–era Blur and Supergrass’ debut album.

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