12 Songs, 1 Hour

EDITORS’ NOTES

Throughout the ‘90s, U2 looked to redefine itself without losing its soul in the process. Naming its album Pop and introducing exciting new sonics that weren’t necessarily as “rock” as its old touchstones announced a band looking to break past the preconceived notions that even Achtung Baby! and Zooropa had blown apart. Yet, in the end, no matter how shiny and amazing the production — and no one gets a more intense sound than Flood — the band always boils down to the quartet at its core. Dave “The Edge” Evans brings his arsenal of tones and riffs, Bono screams to the heavens, and the rhythm section locks into the tightest of grooves. “Discotheque” may head onto the dancefloor with one hand waving frenetically, but it’s still rock n’ roll to anyone for whom it concerns. “Staring at the Sun,” “Mofo,” and “Do You Feel Loved” are every bit as powerful as the better-known anthems in the band’s catalog and no amount of studio sizzle can remove the heart.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Throughout the ‘90s, U2 looked to redefine itself without losing its soul in the process. Naming its album Pop and introducing exciting new sonics that weren’t necessarily as “rock” as its old touchstones announced a band looking to break past the preconceived notions that even Achtung Baby! and Zooropa had blown apart. Yet, in the end, no matter how shiny and amazing the production — and no one gets a more intense sound than Flood — the band always boils down to the quartet at its core. Dave “The Edge” Evans brings his arsenal of tones and riffs, Bono screams to the heavens, and the rhythm section locks into the tightest of grooves. “Discotheque” may head onto the dancefloor with one hand waving frenetically, but it’s still rock n’ roll to anyone for whom it concerns. “Staring at the Sun,” “Mofo,” and “Do You Feel Loved” are every bit as powerful as the better-known anthems in the band’s catalog and no amount of studio sizzle can remove the heart.

TITLE TIME

More By U2