9 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the late 1960s, Judy Collins was hitting her stride and approaching her peak. Her albums were stocked with the finest emerging songwriters, her voice was in ear-raising form and her album productions struck the correct balance between their folk roots, their art song ambitions and the demands of radio. With a stellar backing ensemble, Collins tackles two Leonard Cohen tunes, the iconic “Bird On the Wire” and the Biblically haunting “Story of Isaac.” Ian Tyson’s “Someday Soon” became a standard. Bob Dylan’s slightly more obscure “Poor Immigrant” and Sandy Denny’s title track are the virtual definition of Collins’ constant sophistication with the modern folk song. Collins’ own “My Father” adds a personal note to the proceedings. However, she hardly needs to pen her own songs to convey her deep emotional connection to the material. The Incredible String Band’s “First Boy I Loved” could have come the pages of her own diary considering the intimacy she conveys. Who Knows Where The Time Goes is a career highpoint and an absolute essential of the era.

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the late 1960s, Judy Collins was hitting her stride and approaching her peak. Her albums were stocked with the finest emerging songwriters, her voice was in ear-raising form and her album productions struck the correct balance between their folk roots, their art song ambitions and the demands of radio. With a stellar backing ensemble, Collins tackles two Leonard Cohen tunes, the iconic “Bird On the Wire” and the Biblically haunting “Story of Isaac.” Ian Tyson’s “Someday Soon” became a standard. Bob Dylan’s slightly more obscure “Poor Immigrant” and Sandy Denny’s title track are the virtual definition of Collins’ constant sophistication with the modern folk song. Collins’ own “My Father” adds a personal note to the proceedings. However, she hardly needs to pen her own songs to convey her deep emotional connection to the material. The Incredible String Band’s “First Boy I Loved” could have come the pages of her own diary considering the intimacy she conveys. Who Knows Where The Time Goes is a career highpoint and an absolute essential of the era.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
17 Ratings

17 Ratings

aneyesky ,

Rich instrumentation from CSNY influenced studio work/ awesome California style.

One of a kind gem!

giametti52 ,

A great example of 60's folk-rock

Most of the 60's folkies had their "electric" moments. This is Judy Collins'. Collins always had an exceptionally clear voice, but on this album she finds more power and nuance than on some others. She enlisted her then lover Steven Stills for this record (she was "Judy Blue Eyes) who does exceptional work on this. The reviewer is right: "First Boy I Loved" is a great track, with Stills providing thoughtful and captivating work. Her cover of "Who Knows Where the Time Goes" may not eclipse Fairport Convention, but it comes real close, also with restrained work by Stills. The "Story of Isaac" is another standout.

bob bobblaw ,

unmatched

an inspiration to musicians at all levels . . . .

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