14 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Mexican Institute of Sound—which is actually one person, DJ/producer Camilo Lara—changes things up on Politico. On previous releases, Lara artfully wove together far-flung samples, but the new album features original songs and a live band. One thing hasn’t changed: Lara’s ability to create party music. On the cumbia-flavored title cut, shouts sound out as fun-loving synth squelches tweak the traditional rhythm. “Especulando” rides an insistent groove topped by a variety of keyboard tones and a handful of repeated vocal phrases. “Revolucion!” is a speedy slice of horn-accented garage rock, while the melancholy “México”—one of the best things here—features social commentary. But even that latter song has a perky beat and slicing rhythm guitar. The tropical vibe of “Se Baila Así” gets messed with in playful ways, while marimba runs mark “Tipo Raro,” which has catchy sing-song rapping. Acoustic guitar, a repeating harp figure, and strange keyboards create a woozy dreamworld on “Cumbia Meguro,” while the closer, “El Jefe,” could be a nice spy-movie theme. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

Mexican Institute of Sound—which is actually one person, DJ/producer Camilo Lara—changes things up on Politico. On previous releases, Lara artfully wove together far-flung samples, but the new album features original songs and a live band. One thing hasn’t changed: Lara’s ability to create party music. On the cumbia-flavored title cut, shouts sound out as fun-loving synth squelches tweak the traditional rhythm. “Especulando” rides an insistent groove topped by a variety of keyboard tones and a handful of repeated vocal phrases. “Revolucion!” is a speedy slice of horn-accented garage rock, while the melancholy “México”—one of the best things here—features social commentary. But even that latter song has a perky beat and slicing rhythm guitar. The tropical vibe of “Se Baila Así” gets messed with in playful ways, while marimba runs mark “Tipo Raro,” which has catchy sing-song rapping. Acoustic guitar, a repeating harp figure, and strange keyboards create a woozy dreamworld on “Cumbia Meguro,” while the closer, “El Jefe,” could be a nice spy-movie theme. 

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