12 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Critics have painted M. Ward as something of a star-struck musical revivalist but his work is in truth a thoughtful blend of earnest but lo-fi Nashville classicism and Nilsson-like lyrical play which deserves to be considered on its own terms. On Post-War, Ward’s first album with a full time backing group, he deftly expands on the musical and lyrical themes he has been pursuing throughout his career, bringing fuller expression to his dust blown sonic aesthetic. On the slightly baroque, tympani embellished opener “Poison Cup” Ward plays the role of an unsatisfied lover yearning after a transcendence still greater than Howlin’ Wolf’s fabled “spoonful”, effectively setting the tone for an album full of meditations on man’s inability to realize his romantic ideals. By the time Ward has led the listener through honky-tonk weepers like “Right In the Head” and blues inflected eulogies like “Requiem”, he has thoroughly made his case.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Critics have painted M. Ward as something of a star-struck musical revivalist but his work is in truth a thoughtful blend of earnest but lo-fi Nashville classicism and Nilsson-like lyrical play which deserves to be considered on its own terms. On Post-War, Ward’s first album with a full time backing group, he deftly expands on the musical and lyrical themes he has been pursuing throughout his career, bringing fuller expression to his dust blown sonic aesthetic. On the slightly baroque, tympani embellished opener “Poison Cup” Ward plays the role of an unsatisfied lover yearning after a transcendence still greater than Howlin’ Wolf’s fabled “spoonful”, effectively setting the tone for an album full of meditations on man’s inability to realize his romantic ideals. By the time Ward has led the listener through honky-tonk weepers like “Right In the Head” and blues inflected eulogies like “Requiem”, he has thoroughly made his case.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
114 Ratings

114 Ratings

bowloo ,

another great m-ward album

While it is not quite at the same level as the brilliant Transfiguration of Vincent, Post-War is still really, really good. The first part of the album definetly contains Post-War's best songs, like To Go Home, Requiem, Chinese Translation, and the wonderful opener, Poison Cup. I love M.Ward's newer sound with the backing band, but he still shows throughout the album that he has not lost his touch in creating dreamy, lo-fi songs all guided by his deft guitar playing and smoky cool voice.

Grimmbo ,

"Then Why Is The Night So Long?"

.."And Then The Sun Went Down And Sang For Me This Song!.." O.K.; I've been hearing so much about this M.Ward & today, M.Convinced he is M.Azing! {The album cover reminds me of an old Civil War drum; torn & tattered by having been carried through too many battles!} The music within also sounds Old & Atmospheric; with deliberately distorted vocals and trebly, twangy guitars! (But the lyrics & choruses & choices of instrumentation keep you coming back for repeated listenings; this stuff definitely gets you "Right In The Head!") Hearing "Post-War" recalls other Singer/Songwriters who also paint "Big Pictures!": Bob Dylan, Donovan, Nick Drake, Rufus Wainwright and I'm getting a real "T-Rex" vibe here, too! My picks: Chinese Translation, Post-War, To Go Home & Neptune's Net! Calling this singular song-cycle "Lo-Fi/Alternative/Folk/Pop" would put limits on Mr. M. Ward's "Grand Vision!" Listen to "Post-War" with both your Ears & your Mind open!...by Grimmbo.

mateocole ,

Flawless Victory

Post-War fits into M. Wards catalogue perfectly. Flawless artist indeed. I look forward to seeing the new material live. Instrumentals are moving, and the words impress. Rollercoaster sounds like its from another century, and that's what makes M. Ward so enjoyable. It's a brand new album with brand new songs, but takes you back to a Billie Holiday High.

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