10 Songs, 34 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Whether jinxed by sophomore curse or suffering from the incessant overexposure their debut album's breakout hits "Buddy Holly" and "Undone (The Sweater Song)" spawned, Weezer's second album was a decided commercial disappointment. A more likely culprit seemed Rivers Cuomo's distaste for that hype, leading to a firmer, more provocative hand on the band's fortunes on this 1996 release. That sensibility produces an aggressive, culture-mocking left turn of a single in "El Scorcho," and a sonic approach that is often as cluttered and dark as their debut had been sunny and carefree. The album's loose concept (it was structured around Madame Butterfly) is so slack it likely escaped many listeners, even with the acoustic closer "Butterfly" dropping a final hint. Yet there are flashes of the more familiar Weezer charm in the frustrated romance of "Pink Triangle," the catchy chorus of "The Good Life," and even "Falling For You's" more muscular approach.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Whether jinxed by sophomore curse or suffering from the incessant overexposure their debut album's breakout hits "Buddy Holly" and "Undone (The Sweater Song)" spawned, Weezer's second album was a decided commercial disappointment. A more likely culprit seemed Rivers Cuomo's distaste for that hype, leading to a firmer, more provocative hand on the band's fortunes on this 1996 release. That sensibility produces an aggressive, culture-mocking left turn of a single in "El Scorcho," and a sonic approach that is often as cluttered and dark as their debut had been sunny and carefree. The album's loose concept (it was structured around Madame Butterfly) is so slack it likely escaped many listeners, even with the acoustic closer "Butterfly" dropping a final hint. Yet there are flashes of the more familiar Weezer charm in the frustrated romance of "Pink Triangle," the catchy chorus of "The Good Life," and even "Falling For You's" more muscular approach.

TITLE TIME

More By Weezer