22 Songs, 1 Hour 31 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

After 20 years in the business, E-40 has developed a lot of sides to his career. To some The Ball Street Journal might appear to be all over the place, but it takes a lot of space for a veteran of his caliber to flex every aspect of his persona. 40 can adapt his inimitable delivery to contemporary pop songs (“Wake It Up” and “Pain No More”) then turn around to collaborate with old pals like Ice T and Too Short (“Earl” and “Sliding Down the Pole”). Naturally, the strongest songs return 40 to the Bay Area sound he helped to create. The tracks produced by Rick Rock display a rare perfect fusion between producer and performer: “The Ambassador” and “Tell It Like It Is” feel both classic and futuristic, bombastic yet completely controlled. “Alcoholism” and “Hustle” find 40 collaborating with family and friends from the Sick Wid It umbrella, while “Poor Man’s Hydraulics” and “Got Rich Twice” are two excellent cuts produced by 40’s son, Droop-E. 40 is living proof that a rap star can achieve career longevity by staying true to a single unique vision. Rather than pander to the rap world, the rap world now comes to him, and The Ball Street Journal finds the proud ruler at home in his kingdom.

EDITORS’ NOTES

After 20 years in the business, E-40 has developed a lot of sides to his career. To some The Ball Street Journal might appear to be all over the place, but it takes a lot of space for a veteran of his caliber to flex every aspect of his persona. 40 can adapt his inimitable delivery to contemporary pop songs (“Wake It Up” and “Pain No More”) then turn around to collaborate with old pals like Ice T and Too Short (“Earl” and “Sliding Down the Pole”). Naturally, the strongest songs return 40 to the Bay Area sound he helped to create. The tracks produced by Rick Rock display a rare perfect fusion between producer and performer: “The Ambassador” and “Tell It Like It Is” feel both classic and futuristic, bombastic yet completely controlled. “Alcoholism” and “Hustle” find 40 collaborating with family and friends from the Sick Wid It umbrella, while “Poor Man’s Hydraulics” and “Got Rich Twice” are two excellent cuts produced by 40’s son, Droop-E. 40 is living proof that a rap star can achieve career longevity by staying true to a single unique vision. Rather than pander to the rap world, the rap world now comes to him, and The Ball Street Journal finds the proud ruler at home in his kingdom.

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