15 Songs, 1 Hour 12 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Anyone seeking an album that smartly collects singles and the highlights from Ride's EPs and albums will be happy to find this coherent summary of shoegaze's most misunderstood group. For years, Ride's reputation—along with most anything labeled "shoegaze" that wasn't by My Bloody Valentine—suffered at the hands of critics who didn't hear the melodic beauty behind these occasionally formless (and deliberately so) tunes of great sonic impact. Yet anyone listening without prejudice should find songs that have their roots in everything from The Beatles to The Zombies to R.E.M. and Sonic Youth, and it all comes out sounding surprisingly original. Even "Chelsea Girl" and "Drive Blind" from Ride's self-titled debut EP—and especially "Like a Daydream," from its second EP, Play—exhibit all of the band's best trademarks. Each of Ride's four studio albums is represented, so even its various shifts in sound (such as the nod to The Byrds on 1994's Carnival of Light) are evident. This said, the expanded versions of Ride's albums also deserve a serious look for the extras they offer.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Anyone seeking an album that smartly collects singles and the highlights from Ride's EPs and albums will be happy to find this coherent summary of shoegaze's most misunderstood group. For years, Ride's reputation—along with most anything labeled "shoegaze" that wasn't by My Bloody Valentine—suffered at the hands of critics who didn't hear the melodic beauty behind these occasionally formless (and deliberately so) tunes of great sonic impact. Yet anyone listening without prejudice should find songs that have their roots in everything from The Beatles to The Zombies to R.E.M. and Sonic Youth, and it all comes out sounding surprisingly original. Even "Chelsea Girl" and "Drive Blind" from Ride's self-titled debut EP—and especially "Like a Daydream," from its second EP, Play—exhibit all of the band's best trademarks. Each of Ride's four studio albums is represented, so even its various shifts in sound (such as the nod to The Byrds on 1994's Carnival of Light) are evident. This said, the expanded versions of Ride's albums also deserve a serious look for the extras they offer.

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