14 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

British rapper Mike Skinner's debut album is a snapshot of UK lad culture during the early '00s. Over innovative, grimy electronic beats, Skinner's spoken-word misadventures see him hopping public transportation, swaggering around the pub, and ending his nights with a mix of impending violence and greasy 3 a.m. takeout grub. Check his cheeky Brummie brogue coming to the fore on the skanking "Let's Push Things Forward," while the squelch-funk of "Too Much Brandy" provides the perfect backdrop for his tipsy witticisms.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

British rapper Mike Skinner's debut album is a snapshot of UK lad culture during the early '00s. Over innovative, grimy electronic beats, Skinner's spoken-word misadventures see him hopping public transportation, swaggering around the pub, and ending his nights with a mix of impending violence and greasy 3 a.m. takeout grub. Check his cheeky Brummie brogue coming to the fore on the skanking "Let's Push Things Forward," while the squelch-funk of "Too Much Brandy" provides the perfect backdrop for his tipsy witticisms.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.8 out of 5
62 Ratings

62 Ratings

ATLgunner ,

modern day classic

If you want to get to know THE STREETS, this is the album. It really is a master piece, a modern day classic in its own right. Every track different, every song and lyric perfected. Its raw, its edgy, and it is a sound ALL of its own. And that is why Mike Skinner is a genius.

BenBaconBozeman ,

Entertainment Weekly's Album of the Year for 2002

The word classic gets thrown around for every two-bit wag nowadays, sadly. "Original Pirate Material" truly IS a classic album. Entertainment Weekly named it their album of the year in 2002 (it was released in the UK long before 2004). Rolling Stone, Spin Magazine, The New York Times, Blender, USA Today and the LA Times all nominated it as one of the albums of the year, as well.

phcool ,

A Shot from the Dark

In 2002 "Pirate Material" dropped seemingly out of nowhere. It is easily one of the best albums of the early 21st century, but an independent release with little fanfare didn't help sell copies. Now that the Streets has become a household name in England, it's time to revisit Mike Skinner's fearless first album. "Turn the Page" reveals the lad's vulnerability but also showcases his gift for metaphor. Nearly all the tracks are excellent and interesting, but strung together they create something truly special. Skinner's ability to find words for everyday peoples' problems is remarkable. He's a rabble rouser, an intellectual, an amateur philosopher, and a big-hearted youth. Like his second album "A Grand Don't Come For Free," "Pirate Material" is a showcase for Skinner's narrative style. The Streets has been my favorite artist since I picked up this album, and it rewards like few others do upon further listening.

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