11 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Walking on the path of faith during times of sorrow is a recurring theme on Lindsay McCaul’s sophomore album, One More Step. Since the release of her 2010 debut, the singer/songwriter endured the loss of her father and brother-in-law, moved from Chicago to Nashville, and switched record labels. Her latest songs find her reflecting on tragedy and upheaval in the light of Christ’s redemptive sacrifice. “A Little,” “The In Between,” and “Rule the World” acknowledge her reliance on God without denying her moments of pain and weakness. The positive energy-infusing tracks like the driving “Empty Handed” and ukulele-centered “Mess Like Me” bolster her message of redemption. There are more bittersweet moments as well, such as the title track, a tender tribute to her late father. “With the Brokenhearted” is another high point, an expression of compassion and acceptance sung with Brandon Heath. Musically, One More Step takes McCaul more in a pop/rock direction, and producers Brent Milligan and Jeff Pardo keep the music polished enough for radio airplay without undercutting its confessional integrity.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Walking on the path of faith during times of sorrow is a recurring theme on Lindsay McCaul’s sophomore album, One More Step. Since the release of her 2010 debut, the singer/songwriter endured the loss of her father and brother-in-law, moved from Chicago to Nashville, and switched record labels. Her latest songs find her reflecting on tragedy and upheaval in the light of Christ’s redemptive sacrifice. “A Little,” “The In Between,” and “Rule the World” acknowledge her reliance on God without denying her moments of pain and weakness. The positive energy-infusing tracks like the driving “Empty Handed” and ukulele-centered “Mess Like Me” bolster her message of redemption. There are more bittersweet moments as well, such as the title track, a tender tribute to her late father. “With the Brokenhearted” is another high point, an expression of compassion and acceptance sung with Brandon Heath. Musically, One More Step takes McCaul more in a pop/rock direction, and producers Brent Milligan and Jeff Pardo keep the music polished enough for radio airplay without undercutting its confessional integrity.

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