11 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

On the surface, it'd be easy to imagine a band that mixes rock, rap, and reggae would sound like something out of an early-'90s freshman dorm party. Yet the Philadelphia quartet The Movement makes near-perfect sense of the combo of rock, rap, and reggae. After the group lost singer Josh Swain in 2010, guitarist Jordan Miller took over vocal duties and keyboard wizard John Bowling joined the lineup. The Movement's third studio album, One More Night, opens strong with “When the Feeling Goes Away,” a sprightly reggae-pop tune that contrasts buoyant melodies with bittersweet lyrics. The group immediately downshifts into a sultry ballad with the following “Easy Love,” a lovers-rock standout that matches rootsy keyboards with psychedelic wah-wah guitar and smooth R&B rhythms. Miller’s hip-hop leanings surface in the crisp phrasing of “Something to Say,” while “Area” will please fans of the band’s prior recordings with a full return to its signature funk-rocking rap-reggae style. Bowling’s prowess on the ivories gets the spotlight in the standout jam “Using My Head”: check his flowing solo on a vintage Fender Rhodes.

EDITORS’ NOTES

On the surface, it'd be easy to imagine a band that mixes rock, rap, and reggae would sound like something out of an early-'90s freshman dorm party. Yet the Philadelphia quartet The Movement makes near-perfect sense of the combo of rock, rap, and reggae. After the group lost singer Josh Swain in 2010, guitarist Jordan Miller took over vocal duties and keyboard wizard John Bowling joined the lineup. The Movement's third studio album, One More Night, opens strong with “When the Feeling Goes Away,” a sprightly reggae-pop tune that contrasts buoyant melodies with bittersweet lyrics. The group immediately downshifts into a sultry ballad with the following “Easy Love,” a lovers-rock standout that matches rootsy keyboards with psychedelic wah-wah guitar and smooth R&B rhythms. Miller’s hip-hop leanings surface in the crisp phrasing of “Something to Say,” while “Area” will please fans of the band’s prior recordings with a full return to its signature funk-rocking rap-reggae style. Bowling’s prowess on the ivories gets the spotlight in the standout jam “Using My Head”: check his flowing solo on a vintage Fender Rhodes.

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