19 Songs, 1 Hour 17 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Actually, it’s a two man band. This live collection was recorded at the Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield, MA, July 2007, with keyboardist Larry Goldings joining Taylor for a pleasant and inspired evening of many well-known Taylor classics. “Something in the Way She Moves,” “You’ve Got a Friend,” “Sweet Baby James,” “Carolina In My Mind,” “Fire and Rain,” alongside later faves such as “Never Die Young” and “Copperline” show that Taylor has lost none of his vocal range while his ability to convey the same warm sincerity that catapulted him to fame in the early ‘70s as the prototypical sensitive singer-songwriter remains undiminished. His guitar picking is stellar throughout and Goldings’ piano flourishes are empathetic and never overpowering, though Taylor does allow Goldings a few fine displays (“The Frozen Man,” the jazz leanings of “Mean Old Man” and the instrumental “School”). In between song patter is quick, witty and never a hindrance. Only “Slap Leather” with its faux-funk breaks the mood. Taylor’s songs are amazingly resilient and though obviously he has sung these songs thousands of times, he still brings them to life with empathy and meaning.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Actually, it’s a two man band. This live collection was recorded at the Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield, MA, July 2007, with keyboardist Larry Goldings joining Taylor for a pleasant and inspired evening of many well-known Taylor classics. “Something in the Way She Moves,” “You’ve Got a Friend,” “Sweet Baby James,” “Carolina In My Mind,” “Fire and Rain,” alongside later faves such as “Never Die Young” and “Copperline” show that Taylor has lost none of his vocal range while his ability to convey the same warm sincerity that catapulted him to fame in the early ‘70s as the prototypical sensitive singer-songwriter remains undiminished. His guitar picking is stellar throughout and Goldings’ piano flourishes are empathetic and never overpowering, though Taylor does allow Goldings a few fine displays (“The Frozen Man,” the jazz leanings of “Mean Old Man” and the instrumental “School”). In between song patter is quick, witty and never a hindrance. Only “Slap Leather” with its faux-funk breaks the mood. Taylor’s songs are amazingly resilient and though obviously he has sung these songs thousands of times, he still brings them to life with empathy and meaning.

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