10 Songs, 35 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Citizen Cope (a.k.a. Clarence Greenwood) speaks a language that resonates beyond his lyrics' mellow street poetry. On One Lovely Day, the Memphis-born singer/songwriter fills humble scenes and Everyman stories with a heart-tugging glow thanks to his vocals' grainy, oddly tender quality. Over the past decade, Cope has shown a knack for fusing hip-hop rhythms with old-school R&B melodies and acoustic folk textures. His latest work captures the feel of a July afternoon somewhere in America, as memories of good times mingle with the sights and sounds of the moment. The title track and “Summertime” frame the album with easygoing beats and warm emotions, bolstered by an earthy, affectionate treatment of Allen Toussaint’s “Southern Nights.” The wah-wah guitar and percolating groove of “A Wonder” convey a vintage soul vibe, while “Peace River” cruises into jazzy regions with flute and a brisk tempo. Adding depth to the set are darker pieces like “For a Dollar,” a quietly confrontational tune that simmers with desperation. Cope’s raggedly romantic persona binds it all together.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Citizen Cope (a.k.a. Clarence Greenwood) speaks a language that resonates beyond his lyrics' mellow street poetry. On One Lovely Day, the Memphis-born singer/songwriter fills humble scenes and Everyman stories with a heart-tugging glow thanks to his vocals' grainy, oddly tender quality. Over the past decade, Cope has shown a knack for fusing hip-hop rhythms with old-school R&B melodies and acoustic folk textures. His latest work captures the feel of a July afternoon somewhere in America, as memories of good times mingle with the sights and sounds of the moment. The title track and “Summertime” frame the album with easygoing beats and warm emotions, bolstered by an earthy, affectionate treatment of Allen Toussaint’s “Southern Nights.” The wah-wah guitar and percolating groove of “A Wonder” convey a vintage soul vibe, while “Peace River” cruises into jazzy regions with flute and a brisk tempo. Adding depth to the set are darker pieces like “For a Dollar,” a quietly confrontational tune that simmers with desperation. Cope’s raggedly romantic persona binds it all together.

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