10 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Omar Rodriguez Lopez is best known as the co-leader and guitarist for Mars Volta, but the Puerto Rican native has also released a number of solo recordings. In many ways 2009’s Old Money sounds like a Mars Volta album minus Cedric Bixler Zavala’s vocals, so expect supercharged, complexly arranged, and occasionally Latin-tinged prog rock. (Bixler Zavala plays drums on one track and various Mars Volta members make contributions.) “The Power of Myth” sports Spanish-flavored guitar riffage and prickly synth; the track’s dense, aggressive soundscape recalls Red-period King Crimsom. By contrast, “How to Bill the Bilderberg Group,” with its dubby groove and psych flavor, is spacey rather than hard-hitting. “Trilateral Commission As Dinner Guests” is probably Old Money’s most out track, a jammy affair topped by Adrian Terrazas Gonzalez’s edgy sax. Latin percussion marks “Private Fortunes,” which is the album’s mellowest cut; still, Rodriguez Lopez unleashes a wailing solo that is anything but laid back. Old Money closes with the title cut which turns into a straight-ahead mid-tempo rocker.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Omar Rodriguez Lopez is best known as the co-leader and guitarist for Mars Volta, but the Puerto Rican native has also released a number of solo recordings. In many ways 2009’s Old Money sounds like a Mars Volta album minus Cedric Bixler Zavala’s vocals, so expect supercharged, complexly arranged, and occasionally Latin-tinged prog rock. (Bixler Zavala plays drums on one track and various Mars Volta members make contributions.) “The Power of Myth” sports Spanish-flavored guitar riffage and prickly synth; the track’s dense, aggressive soundscape recalls Red-period King Crimsom. By contrast, “How to Bill the Bilderberg Group,” with its dubby groove and psych flavor, is spacey rather than hard-hitting. “Trilateral Commission As Dinner Guests” is probably Old Money’s most out track, a jammy affair topped by Adrian Terrazas Gonzalez’s edgy sax. Latin percussion marks “Private Fortunes,” which is the album’s mellowest cut; still, Rodriguez Lopez unleashes a wailing solo that is anything but laid back. Old Money closes with the title cut which turns into a straight-ahead mid-tempo rocker.

TITLE TIME

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