20 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A prolific producer/emcee from Oxnard, Calif., Oh No is best known for his long and fruitful association with indie-rap mainstays Stones Throw Records, also home to his brother Madlib. His first solo album (the excellent and totally underrated The Disrupt) dropped back in 2004, followed by the all–Galt MacDermot sample-based Exodus into Unheard Rhythms. Then it was Dr. No's Oxperiment and Dr. No's Ethiopium, both of which showcased his prowess at chopping and reshaping international funk and psych music. More recently, he's been doing the excellent Gangrene project with The Alchemist. Yet on Ohnomite, he enlists an all-star crew of guest emcees—young and old, big and small, east and west—to go off with him over his finely chopped, consistently freaky productions. Subterranean favorites like MF DOOM ("3 Dollars") and Roc Marciano ("The Hitmen") make appearances, as do old-school legends like Phife Dawg ("Dues 'n' Don'ts") and Erick Sermon ("Runnin' the Show"). We also get several great instrumental interludes, most notably "Ohnomite Jazz" and "Piano." It's another impressive effort from one of hip-hop's most constantly compelling artists. 

EDITORS’ NOTES

A prolific producer/emcee from Oxnard, Calif., Oh No is best known for his long and fruitful association with indie-rap mainstays Stones Throw Records, also home to his brother Madlib. His first solo album (the excellent and totally underrated The Disrupt) dropped back in 2004, followed by the all–Galt MacDermot sample-based Exodus into Unheard Rhythms. Then it was Dr. No's Oxperiment and Dr. No's Ethiopium, both of which showcased his prowess at chopping and reshaping international funk and psych music. More recently, he's been doing the excellent Gangrene project with The Alchemist. Yet on Ohnomite, he enlists an all-star crew of guest emcees—young and old, big and small, east and west—to go off with him over his finely chopped, consistently freaky productions. Subterranean favorites like MF DOOM ("3 Dollars") and Roc Marciano ("The Hitmen") make appearances, as do old-school legends like Phife Dawg ("Dues 'n' Don'ts") and Erick Sermon ("Runnin' the Show"). We also get several great instrumental interludes, most notably "Ohnomite Jazz" and "Piano." It's another impressive effort from one of hip-hop's most constantly compelling artists. 

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