14 Songs, 38 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Lee Hazlewood had his hands full with country music in 1967—the year he worked with Gram Parsons’ International Submarine Band and its pioneering country-rock album Safe at Home. He also took on Nancy Sinatra’s fourth solo album, enlisting a team of Nashville session musicians to keep a semblance of Music City authenticity. In the opening cover of Dale Noe’s “It’s Such a Pretty World Today,” Hazlewood’s production almost overdoes it; a group of backing choral singers are mixed louder than Sinatra’s voice to play like an exaggeration of the '60s Nashville sound. Their singing sits better in the following “Get While the Gettin’s Good,” cooing in the periphery of Sinatra’s commanding performance. When mixed well, Sinatra's voice fits Hazlewood’s interpretation of country like a well-tailored rhinestone suit. Sure, no cover of “Walk Through This World with Me” is as perfect as the George Jones original—but Sinatra’s silky timbre easily makes for the best female-sung rendition of this classic honky-tonk weeper. Her duet with Hazlewood on “Jackson” broke the pop Top 20.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Lee Hazlewood had his hands full with country music in 1967—the year he worked with Gram Parsons’ International Submarine Band and its pioneering country-rock album Safe at Home. He also took on Nancy Sinatra’s fourth solo album, enlisting a team of Nashville session musicians to keep a semblance of Music City authenticity. In the opening cover of Dale Noe’s “It’s Such a Pretty World Today,” Hazlewood’s production almost overdoes it; a group of backing choral singers are mixed louder than Sinatra’s voice to play like an exaggeration of the '60s Nashville sound. Their singing sits better in the following “Get While the Gettin’s Good,” cooing in the periphery of Sinatra’s commanding performance. When mixed well, Sinatra's voice fits Hazlewood’s interpretation of country like a well-tailored rhinestone suit. Sure, no cover of “Walk Through This World with Me” is as perfect as the George Jones original—but Sinatra’s silky timbre easily makes for the best female-sung rendition of this classic honky-tonk weeper. Her duet with Hazlewood on “Jackson” broke the pop Top 20.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.0 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

MadFelcher ,

Step aside Loretta and Patsy, Nancy is taking over

This girl is America's sweetheart and there isn't a genre she didn't own when she sang it. Nancy captivates the lonely man's heart with her sweet tender voice singing about heartbreak, heartloss, and heartache. Johnny and June aint got nothing on Nancy's version of Jackson. It's like she walked right into Jackson her own self and tore it up like a hurricane in a trailer park. And when she sings Lonely Again I wish I would take the loneliness from her and fill it up to it was brimming over.

j-dogSF ,

An under-appreciated album by a criminally ignored artist

"Country, My Way," is one of Nancy's best album of the '60s. In addition to spawning the Top 20 hit, "Jackson," a duet with her mentor Lee Hazlewood, it also features popular country-pop songs of the day such as "Walk Through This World With Me," and "End of the World." Plus there are some Hazlewood originals, notably "By the Way (I Still Love You)," which is undoubtedly the album's most profoundly beautiful moment, and one of Nancy's finest recordings.

TJ Slim ,

"JACKSON" DON'T BUY THIS VERSION

The version of "Jackson" is better on the "Nancy and Lee" CD. A great song either way.

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