9 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the time of their fourth album, 1984’s Ocean Rain, Echo and the Bunnymen had begrudgingly accepted that they were part of a musical wave that might never achieve mainstream UK and US acceptance. Their blend of retro-60s psychedelic pop and ‘80s new wave aggression fared far better in England where the group’s distinct Englishness was easier to assimilate in an era when the U.S. was celebrating the heartland rock of John Cougar Mellencamp and Bruce Springsteen. But that didn’t stop the group from trying to make the most challenging and accessible music of its career. The band advertised Ocean Rain as “the greatest album ever made.” While that’s a serious bit of overhype, the album does contain several group highlights. The otherworldly shimmer and singer Ian McCulloch’s British Jim Morrison come-on for “The Killing Moon” makes it a serious candidate for the band’s finest track. “Silver” and “Nocturnal Me” explore the moody temperament that made the band natural favorites among emotionally high-strung adolescents.

EDITORS’ NOTES

By the time of their fourth album, 1984’s Ocean Rain, Echo and the Bunnymen had begrudgingly accepted that they were part of a musical wave that might never achieve mainstream UK and US acceptance. Their blend of retro-60s psychedelic pop and ‘80s new wave aggression fared far better in England where the group’s distinct Englishness was easier to assimilate in an era when the U.S. was celebrating the heartland rock of John Cougar Mellencamp and Bruce Springsteen. But that didn’t stop the group from trying to make the most challenging and accessible music of its career. The band advertised Ocean Rain as “the greatest album ever made.” While that’s a serious bit of overhype, the album does contain several group highlights. The otherworldly shimmer and singer Ian McCulloch’s British Jim Morrison come-on for “The Killing Moon” makes it a serious candidate for the band’s finest track. “Silver” and “Nocturnal Me” explore the moody temperament that made the band natural favorites among emotionally high-strung adolescents.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.9 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

popeye doyle ,

A Perfect Album

I have been listening to this album since its release 24 years ago and have not tired of it at all. This album truly deserves classic status. Its too bad that most Americans have not appreciated this band and particularly this album. It remains a great album to listen to late at night. The strings, his voice and the lyrics all contribute to a romantic vision of rock best appreciated in the solitude of a quiet dark night.

trex67 ,

Phenomenal - Highly recommended

Not enough superlatives to describe this record. Just buy it. You won't be sorry.

_Jen_ ,

Unbelievably Perfect

Of all Echo and the Bunnymen's great albums, this is my favorite. Not a single song strikes me as a "filler," the songs thrown together in ten minutes to put more songs on the album. My personal favorite is "Nocturnal Me," a haunting song that gives me chills every time I listen to it. Anyone who's seen Donnie Darko will recognize "The Killing Moon," the opening song to the movie and a great one besides. And "Thorn of Crowns" ? What other band have you heard (besides They Might Be Giants) that will use vegetables in their songs? AND still sound cool?
You won't regret buying this album. Ever.

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