12 Songs, 41 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The postpunk and industrial sounds of the ‘80s are the departure points for Mode Moderne’s Occult Delight—but don’t get the idea that this Vancouver quartet’s third album is just an exercise in revivalism. There’s a 21st-century sense of angst here, informed by crashed economies and tangled gender politics. True, there’s an undeniable Morrissey-like quality to lead singer Philip Intile’s deep croon, and a Joy Division–esque gloomy sheen to the sound overall. The oddly jaunty feel of “Strangle the Shadows” and “Baby Bunny” combine shoegazer introspection with a knack for keen pop hooks. Intile and his comrades lace their tunes with a twisted wit that manifests itself in the ghoulish good cheer of “Unburden Yourself” and “Severed Head.” Achingly romantic numbers like “Come Sunrise” and the title track transcend any latent irony with their sheer bleak beauty. From the throbbing groove of “Thieving Baby’s Breath” to the clattering glide of “She, Untamed” and the brooding, string-accented balladry of “Running Scared,” Mode Moderne keep finding new niches of melancholy to explore.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The postpunk and industrial sounds of the ‘80s are the departure points for Mode Moderne’s Occult Delight—but don’t get the idea that this Vancouver quartet’s third album is just an exercise in revivalism. There’s a 21st-century sense of angst here, informed by crashed economies and tangled gender politics. True, there’s an undeniable Morrissey-like quality to lead singer Philip Intile’s deep croon, and a Joy Division–esque gloomy sheen to the sound overall. The oddly jaunty feel of “Strangle the Shadows” and “Baby Bunny” combine shoegazer introspection with a knack for keen pop hooks. Intile and his comrades lace their tunes with a twisted wit that manifests itself in the ghoulish good cheer of “Unburden Yourself” and “Severed Head.” Achingly romantic numbers like “Come Sunrise” and the title track transcend any latent irony with their sheer bleak beauty. From the throbbing groove of “Thieving Baby’s Breath” to the clattering glide of “She, Untamed” and the brooding, string-accented balladry of “Running Scared,” Mode Moderne keep finding new niches of melancholy to explore.

TITLE TIME

More By Mode Moderne

You May Also Like