6 Songs, 25 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Will Oldham constantly throws surprises our way. On this EP, he reconvenes his band from Wolfroy Goes to Town to rework six tunes from his back catalog, ranging from 1999 to 2009. The earliest song included here is rather a shock, as “I See a Darkness” is cited by many a fan as the most perfect Bonnie “Prince” Billy song. Remarkably, Oldham breathes light and something like optimism into the tune, and the new version ends up being a gently rollicking track that inspires a shuffle and a chorus sing-along. Angel Olsen’s voice intertwined with Oldham’s on “Darkness” and throughout the EP is a remarkable thing. Paired so exquisitely on the country honky-tonk tune “I Don’t Belong to Anyone” and the spacious and spare “Three Questions,” her lovely voice—nudged against Oldham’s forlorn style—brings another facet of mournful beauty to his music. The haunting “No Gold Digger” glows with warmth but conveys the lonesome gloom that rang in the electronic percussion of the original. These tracks accompany a 2012 book by Oldham, in which he reflects on the creative process and recounts conversations with avant-garde artist and writer Alan Licht.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Will Oldham constantly throws surprises our way. On this EP, he reconvenes his band from Wolfroy Goes to Town to rework six tunes from his back catalog, ranging from 1999 to 2009. The earliest song included here is rather a shock, as “I See a Darkness” is cited by many a fan as the most perfect Bonnie “Prince” Billy song. Remarkably, Oldham breathes light and something like optimism into the tune, and the new version ends up being a gently rollicking track that inspires a shuffle and a chorus sing-along. Angel Olsen’s voice intertwined with Oldham’s on “Darkness” and throughout the EP is a remarkable thing. Paired so exquisitely on the country honky-tonk tune “I Don’t Belong to Anyone” and the spacious and spare “Three Questions,” her lovely voice—nudged against Oldham’s forlorn style—brings another facet of mournful beauty to his music. The haunting “No Gold Digger” glows with warmth but conveys the lonesome gloom that rang in the electronic percussion of the original. These tracks accompany a 2012 book by Oldham, in which he reflects on the creative process and recounts conversations with avant-garde artist and writer Alan Licht.

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