9 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

For years after his bandmate Charlie Cooper’s death, Joshua Eustis focused his energies on anything but continuing their work as Telefon Tel Aviv. He toured with Nine Inch Nails, programmed wildly experimental beats in Second Woman, wrung out his heart in his solo project Sons of Magdalene. But a decade after the duo’s final album, 2009’s Immolate Yourself, Eustis returns to the alias with Dreams Are Not Enough, a devastating album that pairs exquisite melancholy with breathtakingly advanced sounds and programming. TTA’s records always ran a gamut of styles, from IDM to moody synth-pop and beyond, and this album is no different. Clearly meant to be heard in one sitting—the track titles combine to form a poem—the record alternates between overdriven ambient and shuffling electro-pop, brokenhearted acid and chamber choir. It all rests atop a rhythmic base that stretches like the fabric of space-time as a black hole looms close. The pit at the heart of that emptiness? Endless, unfathomable melancholy—yet rendered with a rare degree of grace. For all its unremitting bleakness, the album promises something like salvation.

EDITORS’ NOTES

For years after his bandmate Charlie Cooper’s death, Joshua Eustis focused his energies on anything but continuing their work as Telefon Tel Aviv. He toured with Nine Inch Nails, programmed wildly experimental beats in Second Woman, wrung out his heart in his solo project Sons of Magdalene. But a decade after the duo’s final album, 2009’s Immolate Yourself, Eustis returns to the alias with Dreams Are Not Enough, a devastating album that pairs exquisite melancholy with breathtakingly advanced sounds and programming. TTA’s records always ran a gamut of styles, from IDM to moody synth-pop and beyond, and this album is no different. Clearly meant to be heard in one sitting—the track titles combine to form a poem—the record alternates between overdriven ambient and shuffling electro-pop, brokenhearted acid and chamber choir. It all rests atop a rhythmic base that stretches like the fabric of space-time as a black hole looms close. The pit at the heart of that emptiness? Endless, unfathomable melancholy—yet rendered with a rare degree of grace. For all its unremitting bleakness, the album promises something like salvation.

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Ratings and Reviews

5.0 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

davejinx ,

continued excellence

TTA has created a beautiful album, something worth listening to again and again!!!!

83LV/// OVRSOUL ,

Hauntingly Beautiful Painfully Gorgeous

TTA

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