29 Songs, 1 Hour 16 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

A gloriously ramshackle exploration of basement-rock excess, God Ween Satan has endured because it's as skillful as it is sidesplitting. Emerging after a string of self-released underground cassettes cemented the artistic partnership of high school pals Aaron Freeman and Mickey Melchiondo (a.k.a. Gene and Dean Ween), this double-LP opus was first released on the Minneapolis-based Twin/Tone label, best known for the reckless bar rock of The Replacements and Soul Asylum. Though Ween's often written off as a joke project, the band respected a certain kind of classic rock majesty—just approaching it from a different angle. With its gargantuan double-gatefold presentation and panoply of genre experiments, God Ween Satan is at once a satire and celebration of pop music in all its trashiest and most colorful forms. While the word “satire” might reek of intellectual elitism, Ween was just the opposite. Its debut succeeded because its mirth was genuine. Despite many cacophonous moments, the sentiment here isn't of bitterness but of pure unadulterated glee.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.

EDITORS’ NOTES

A gloriously ramshackle exploration of basement-rock excess, God Ween Satan has endured because it's as skillful as it is sidesplitting. Emerging after a string of self-released underground cassettes cemented the artistic partnership of high school pals Aaron Freeman and Mickey Melchiondo (a.k.a. Gene and Dean Ween), this double-LP opus was first released on the Minneapolis-based Twin/Tone label, best known for the reckless bar rock of The Replacements and Soul Asylum. Though Ween's often written off as a joke project, the band respected a certain kind of classic rock majesty—just approaching it from a different angle. With its gargantuan double-gatefold presentation and panoply of genre experiments, God Ween Satan is at once a satire and celebration of pop music in all its trashiest and most colorful forms. While the word “satire” might reek of intellectual elitism, Ween was just the opposite. Its debut succeeded because its mirth was genuine. Despite many cacophonous moments, the sentiment here isn't of bitterness but of pure unadulterated glee.

Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics.
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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
55 Ratings

55 Ratings

rocketsauce v2 ,

Craziest first album ever

From the opening screams of 'You F****d Up' to the barely audible "gener and i smoke too much weed" of 'Puffy Cloud', Gene and Dean take you quite the roller coaster of musicalness. They rock hard on tracks like 'Fat Lenny', are silly on tracks like 'Don't Laugh I Love You', groove on tracks like 'LMLYP', and show their abilities to write radio-friendly type songs like 'Marble Tulip Juicy Tree'. This, their first album, introduces what Ween would be bringing to brave listeners in the years to come, albiet it is quite strange and erratic. Lots of good music here, my favorites are 'Tick', 'Fat Lenny', 'Never Squeal', 'Nicole', 'LMLYP' and 'Marble Tulip Juicy Tree'.

Fuzzy Casserole ,

Classic, but not enjoyable

In theory, I love this album. It's a brilliant exhibition of Ween's pure insanity and inanity, that jumps from every conceivable topic and style, all thrown way past the boundaries of reason. Unfortunately, it's just not pleasant listening, and I almost never call it up on my playlists, with the exception of a few songs that showcase the sound that Ween shows off in their later albums, like El Camino, Nicole, and Nan.

rfejrsdad ,

God ween satan

This has got to be one the best and strangest albums ever recorded. I remember hearing this album when it first came out and was immediately blown away. If you don' t own any of the Ween albums this is the one to get. Gotta love these guys!

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