14 Songs, 56 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Kieran Hebden’s restlessly inventive, genre-splicing music is often as unpredictable as it is hypnotic. That holds firmly on his ninth album as Four Tet, where harp-mottled openers “Alap” and “Two Thousand and Seventeen” suggest the supple, folk-inflected electronic of 2003’s Rounds but soon give way to singular experiments in ambient techno (“LA Trance”), head-nodding deep house (“SW9 9SL”), and abstract neoclassical (“10 Midi”). As ever, Hebden builds his music with precision, warmth, and a rare gift for consuming melodies.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Kieran Hebden’s restlessly inventive, genre-splicing music is often as unpredictable as it is hypnotic. That holds firmly on his ninth album as Four Tet, where harp-mottled openers “Alap” and “Two Thousand and Seventeen” suggest the supple, folk-inflected electronic of 2003’s Rounds but soon give way to singular experiments in ambient techno (“LA Trance”), head-nodding deep house (“SW9 9SL”), and abstract neoclassical (“10 Midi”). As ever, Hebden builds his music with precision, warmth, and a rare gift for consuming melodies.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.4 out of 5
17 Ratings

17 Ratings

Instant.Nick.92 ,

New Energy

Loved this album, it feels like a perfect mix. Great job Kieran

LivingstonScott ,

Rock Nipples

Who would have known rock nipples (the cover art as I see it) would sound so much like an ear blessing? Gorgeous.

themk ,

Propulsion

We live in a time when (and a space where) everything is presented to us as fact, and that is all really awful, usually. This record - and what Four Tet has been gracing us with for years - stands firmly against all of that, and shows us that there is more; and that More is beautiful, and subtle, and hopeful, somehow. We are all better for it. It is propulsion towards a better future.

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