10 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Japanese rock trio Boris is known for its heavy, Melvins/Earth-inspired alt-metal and its genre-hopping abilities, plus its collaborations with experimental artists such as Merzbow, Keiji Haino, and Sunn O))). In 2011, the shapeshifting unit put out three stylistically diverse albums: Attention Please, Heavy Rocks, and New Album. The latter release, which includes reworkings of material from the other two albums as well as new originals, displays a mélange of influences from the '90s. “Flare” announces itself with the sound of a siren before becoming a sort of unholy marriage of punk and Yes-like prog with electronic squiggles thrown in. “Hope” is a slice of delightful indie pop à la Flaming Lips that comes decked out with Mellotron backing. “Party Boy” shifts into dance music, but the band’s melodic sensibilities tie it to the other songs. “Spoon” occupies the sort of blissed-out space My Bloody Valentine called home, while “Pardon?” is a slow, spare respite from the surrounding high-energy workouts. The catchy and dramatic “Looprider” closes the album on a high note.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The Japanese rock trio Boris is known for its heavy, Melvins/Earth-inspired alt-metal and its genre-hopping abilities, plus its collaborations with experimental artists such as Merzbow, Keiji Haino, and Sunn O))). In 2011, the shapeshifting unit put out three stylistically diverse albums: Attention Please, Heavy Rocks, and New Album. The latter release, which includes reworkings of material from the other two albums as well as new originals, displays a mélange of influences from the '90s. “Flare” announces itself with the sound of a siren before becoming a sort of unholy marriage of punk and Yes-like prog with electronic squiggles thrown in. “Hope” is a slice of delightful indie pop à la Flaming Lips that comes decked out with Mellotron backing. “Party Boy” shifts into dance music, but the band’s melodic sensibilities tie it to the other songs. “Spoon” occupies the sort of blissed-out space My Bloody Valentine called home, while “Pardon?” is a slow, spare respite from the surrounding high-energy workouts. The catchy and dramatic “Looprider” closes the album on a high note.

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