17 Songs, 1 Hour 11 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

"Kimba fa" is an African saying popular in Eva Ayllón’s native Peru, translating roughly as "joyous energy." It’s the perfect moniker for the 22nd album by the fiery Peruvian legend (and first new collection of new music in five years), a musically diverse reflection of the soulful Afro-Latin fusion and Creole roots the singer has pursued with a passion since the ‘70s. But while the music here spans a full century of eclectic homeland influences — centered on the festejo and lando traditions that have found her acclaimed as "Peru’s Tina Turner" — there’s nothing revivalist about Ayllón’s muse; the performances here span nostalgic, Lima-rooted folk ballad vals like "Huye de Mi" and "Nada Soy" to the brash, hip hop-suffused contemporary pop of "Akundun," where the sultry chanteuse even lays down a fevered, staccato rhyme.

EDITORS’ NOTES

"Kimba fa" is an African saying popular in Eva Ayllón’s native Peru, translating roughly as "joyous energy." It’s the perfect moniker for the 22nd album by the fiery Peruvian legend (and first new collection of new music in five years), a musically diverse reflection of the soulful Afro-Latin fusion and Creole roots the singer has pursued with a passion since the ‘70s. But while the music here spans a full century of eclectic homeland influences — centered on the festejo and lando traditions that have found her acclaimed as "Peru’s Tina Turner" — there’s nothing revivalist about Ayllón’s muse; the performances here span nostalgic, Lima-rooted folk ballad vals like "Huye de Mi" and "Nada Soy" to the brash, hip hop-suffused contemporary pop of "Akundun," where the sultry chanteuse even lays down a fevered, staccato rhyme.

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