11 Songs, 50 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

No longer the Swedish-born phenomenon who tore it up down in New Orleans, guitarist/singer Anders Osborne has the ambition and versatility to record a steady stream of blues-rock albums while also playing with the likes of Phil Lesh, New Orleans Indians, and others. Osborne's 11th album, Peace, ranges from the politically charged blues-rock of “5 Bullets” to the lumbering, Crazy Horse–like title track. Like so many modern-day bluesmen, his voice is serviceable in an everyman sort of way. It’s his lyrics’ strong narrative threads that offer real insight into the human condition and the artist himself as he continues to wrestle with some demons of happenstance (post-Katrina life in New Orleans) as well as self-inflicted (“Let It Go”). This ain’t no pity party, however. He downshifts into a light reggae called “Sarah Anne” and offers up jam-band rock on the contemplative “47” and the driving acoustic midlife reality check “Windows.” Finishing on a note of redemption, Osborne closes things out with “My Son,” which is both earnest and sweet.

EDITORS’ NOTES

No longer the Swedish-born phenomenon who tore it up down in New Orleans, guitarist/singer Anders Osborne has the ambition and versatility to record a steady stream of blues-rock albums while also playing with the likes of Phil Lesh, New Orleans Indians, and others. Osborne's 11th album, Peace, ranges from the politically charged blues-rock of “5 Bullets” to the lumbering, Crazy Horse–like title track. Like so many modern-day bluesmen, his voice is serviceable in an everyman sort of way. It’s his lyrics’ strong narrative threads that offer real insight into the human condition and the artist himself as he continues to wrestle with some demons of happenstance (post-Katrina life in New Orleans) as well as self-inflicted (“Let It Go”). This ain’t no pity party, however. He downshifts into a light reggae called “Sarah Anne” and offers up jam-band rock on the contemplative “47” and the driving acoustic midlife reality check “Windows.” Finishing on a note of redemption, Osborne closes things out with “My Son,” which is both earnest and sweet.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.4 out of 5
37 Ratings

37 Ratings

Cree Mo ,

Top Shelf

Like all his previous albums this one is addictive from the first song. Deep, meaningful lyrics. A good shot of psychedelia, tastefully done. Distinct Anders Osborne guitar and rhythm. Masterfully produced. It's all there. Like an eleven course meal, each song leads into and goes perfectly with the next. Who dat? Anders Osborne. That's who.

cmw1066 ,

Peace

This guy is amazing. The quantity and quality of music Anders has put out since he joined Alligator Records is simply ridiculous. If he keeps putting out music like this, Anders is bound to get the recognition he deserves. It's tough to say what songs to recommend off this album, but, as of right now, my personal favorites are let it go, I'm ready, sarah anne, and dream girl. You'd do well to just buy the whole album.

A Connecticut Yankee In King Oliver's Court ,

Best yet

Thank you, Anders. This is a fantastic, complete album. The best in a catalogue of outstanding work.

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