11 Songs, 39 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Otis Rush already had more than a decade of success as a recording artist behind him by the time he cut his first full-length album, Mourning in the Morning, but up until then his catalog had been confined to singles. Seemingly out of a desire to reach beyond his core blues audience, he made a stylistic shift, recording at the renowned FAME Studio in Muscle Shoals, Ala., and incorporating contemporary soul and rock 'n' roll influences. This was accomplished with the help of FAME session men, including a young Duane Allman, and members of the blues-rock band The Electric Flag (EF's Mike Bloomfield and Nick Gravenites were the album's producers). On tunes like B.B. King's "Gambler's Blues" and Rush's own "My Love Will Never Die," the Muscle Shoals crew have no trouble laying into the kind of sinuous Chicago blues groove that made Rush famous. But the soul-pop bounce of such Bloomfield/Gravenites-penned tunes as "Can't Wait No Longer" and "My Old Lady" pushes things further.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Otis Rush already had more than a decade of success as a recording artist behind him by the time he cut his first full-length album, Mourning in the Morning, but up until then his catalog had been confined to singles. Seemingly out of a desire to reach beyond his core blues audience, he made a stylistic shift, recording at the renowned FAME Studio in Muscle Shoals, Ala., and incorporating contemporary soul and rock 'n' roll influences. This was accomplished with the help of FAME session men, including a young Duane Allman, and members of the blues-rock band The Electric Flag (EF's Mike Bloomfield and Nick Gravenites were the album's producers). On tunes like B.B. King's "Gambler's Blues" and Rush's own "My Love Will Never Die," the Muscle Shoals crew have no trouble laying into the kind of sinuous Chicago blues groove that made Rush famous. But the soul-pop bounce of such Bloomfield/Gravenites-penned tunes as "Can't Wait No Longer" and "My Old Lady" pushes things further.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

MojoGuzzi ,

Allman Adds Tremendously

While some songs are admittedly dated, this album has been in my sights for many years...ever since first hearing "Reap What You Sow" on the Duane Allman Anthology (volume I, I think). Allman's lead solo on this track is stellar. His work on other songs rings true as a complement to Otis Rush's West Side Chicago style. "You're Killing My Love" was a fine Nick Gravenites/Electric Flad tune done much more bluesy here. And Freddie King's "Gambler's Blues" is a fine addition to anyone's blues library.

Radio420 ,

Five stars for the last track alone

The whole album is dope but the last track is one of the baddest ever laid on wax. Trust me on this people, and spring for the $.99 if you don't want the whole album. It sounds like the best song Otis Redding never recorded, it's truly out of this freaking world. I can't say enough about it to do it justice you've got to buy it. If that's not enough, Duane Allman plays rhythym guitar on the album.

turtlesoup123 ,

Otis Rush Atlantic sessions..

This album is real cool. Its more funky than other recordings of his, and has a fat horn section. Features alot of Duan Allmans as the session guitar player. When it comes to Otis Rush music the music he recorded for cobra was defanatly the cream of the crop, and this cd does have two re-recorded cobra singles "My Love Will Never Die" and "It Takes Time". This cd is essential and should defanatly be in your collection!

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