13 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Kiss’ 20th studio album features Paul Stanley, Gene Simmons, guitarist Tommy Thayer, and drummer Eric Singer, with the latter two donning makeup in the styles of Ace Frehley and Peter Criss, respectively, to give the illusion that this was ’70s-styled Kiss in their heyday. The double entendres (sometimes single entendres), the super-catchy choruses, and the simple guitar riffs never went out of style for the group, but somehow Monster sounds like they researched what worked best for them and then actually made it happen. “Hell or Hallelujah” is a decent audience play for Paul Stanley to further induce partying at their concerts, with “Wall of Sound” nailing touches of Hotter Than Hell–style hard rock riffage. It’s obvious that Gene Simmons would make a vocal appearance on “The Devil Is Me,” just as Stanley needs to take the mic for “All for the Love of Rock & Roll,” which sounds like it came from his 1978 solo album. “Eat Your Heart Out” adds more cowbell than heard on any other Kiss album in history. It's quite the comeback.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Kiss’ 20th studio album features Paul Stanley, Gene Simmons, guitarist Tommy Thayer, and drummer Eric Singer, with the latter two donning makeup in the styles of Ace Frehley and Peter Criss, respectively, to give the illusion that this was ’70s-styled Kiss in their heyday. The double entendres (sometimes single entendres), the super-catchy choruses, and the simple guitar riffs never went out of style for the group, but somehow Monster sounds like they researched what worked best for them and then actually made it happen. “Hell or Hallelujah” is a decent audience play for Paul Stanley to further induce partying at their concerts, with “Wall of Sound” nailing touches of Hotter Than Hell–style hard rock riffage. It’s obvious that Gene Simmons would make a vocal appearance on “The Devil Is Me,” just as Stanley needs to take the mic for “All for the Love of Rock & Roll,” which sounds like it came from his 1978 solo album. “Eat Your Heart Out” adds more cowbell than heard on any other Kiss album in history. It's quite the comeback.

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