13 Songs, 36 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Anyone who's succumbed to Fleet Foxes' magical vocal harmonies may also fall for the Los Angeles folk-pop quintet Milo Greene. This band similarly switches up instruments from song to song while singing in gorgeous three- (and sometimes four-) part harmonies. At the epicenter of these heavenly voices is multi-instrumentalist and chanteuse Marlana Sheetz. “What’s the Matter” opens with her singing like an American Christine McVie over rustic baroque pop. Ample use of reverb makes the following “Orpheus” resonate with a haunting beauty, before the summery “Don’t You Give Up on Me” plays like Fleetwood Sparks (i.e., a perfect balance of Fleetwood Mac and Beachwood Sparks). The band treads close to Graceland-era Paul Simon (albeit with a heavy indie slant) in the harmonious and percussive “Perfectly Aligned,” where Sheetz lets her demure vocals break with a palpable heartache in the song’s more sublime moments. The band’s penchant for rambling like bona fide folkies is most evident in the catchy “1957,” while “Silent Way” plays like country shoegazing with its towering walls of traditional tones and layered singing.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Anyone who's succumbed to Fleet Foxes' magical vocal harmonies may also fall for the Los Angeles folk-pop quintet Milo Greene. This band similarly switches up instruments from song to song while singing in gorgeous three- (and sometimes four-) part harmonies. At the epicenter of these heavenly voices is multi-instrumentalist and chanteuse Marlana Sheetz. “What’s the Matter” opens with her singing like an American Christine McVie over rustic baroque pop. Ample use of reverb makes the following “Orpheus” resonate with a haunting beauty, before the summery “Don’t You Give Up on Me” plays like Fleetwood Sparks (i.e., a perfect balance of Fleetwood Mac and Beachwood Sparks). The band treads close to Graceland-era Paul Simon (albeit with a heavy indie slant) in the harmonious and percussive “Perfectly Aligned,” where Sheetz lets her demure vocals break with a palpable heartache in the song’s more sublime moments. The band’s penchant for rambling like bona fide folkies is most evident in the catchy “1957,” while “Silent Way” plays like country shoegazing with its towering walls of traditional tones and layered singing.

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