10 Songs, 47 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

With so many young bands emulating the music of the ‘80s—and the alternative sounds of Echo & The Bunnymen, Joy Division/New Order, and Depeche Mode, most of all—it’s a relief when the key players of the era come back and remind us why they were always the innovators and never the followers. 2014’s Meteorites brings singer Ian McCulloch and guitarist Will Sergeant together with another key innovator: producer Youth. Having a producer as ambitious as the band turns songs like “Holy Moses,” “Is This a Breakdown,” and “Lovers on the Run” into epic-scale Echo tunes. Guitars work up from atmospherics to concise riffs with ease, while string arrangements and grandiose vocal arrangements create entire new worlds. Even the more modestly paced “Grapes Upon the Vine” features a split-octave vocal and plush velvet beds of sound worthy of the band that cut Ocean Rain. McCulloch’s vocals haven’t aged a day, guaranteeing this album is as essential as any album they’ve made since the earth-shattering Crocodiles

EDITORS’ NOTES

With so many young bands emulating the music of the ‘80s—and the alternative sounds of Echo & The Bunnymen, Joy Division/New Order, and Depeche Mode, most of all—it’s a relief when the key players of the era come back and remind us why they were always the innovators and never the followers. 2014’s Meteorites brings singer Ian McCulloch and guitarist Will Sergeant together with another key innovator: producer Youth. Having a producer as ambitious as the band turns songs like “Holy Moses,” “Is This a Breakdown,” and “Lovers on the Run” into epic-scale Echo tunes. Guitars work up from atmospherics to concise riffs with ease, while string arrangements and grandiose vocal arrangements create entire new worlds. Even the more modestly paced “Grapes Upon the Vine” features a split-octave vocal and plush velvet beds of sound worthy of the band that cut Ocean Rain. McCulloch’s vocals haven’t aged a day, guaranteeing this album is as essential as any album they’ve made since the earth-shattering Crocodiles

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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
58 Ratings

58 Ratings

DeepMining ,

Startling and unique--after 35 years

I go back to the early 80s with the Bunnymen, and have seem them about six times over the past 30 years. I'd put Meteorites right up there with Heaven Up Here (my favorite Bunnymen album). Yeah, I know that sounds overblown, but hear me out...I love Ian's voice and lyrics, but my number one Bunnymen pull has always been Will Sergeant's ethereal sitar-tinged guitar riffs and runs. Though I thought The Fountain was a solid album, as well as Siberia and What Are You Going to Do with Your LIfe?, Meteorites, for me, is head and shoulders above the handful of post-reunion albums featuring just MacCullogh and Sergeant. On those past few albums I feel like I've had to hunt for Will's shining moments--like on Scissors in the Sand when Will breaks out with a classic flourish half-way through the song. Those "where are you, Will?" touches are full-blown, however, on Meteorites, especially on songs such as Market Town (a blissful seven-plus minutes of Sergeant at his best), Holy Moses, and my favorite, Constantinople. This is a muscular, fully formed album that brings out the best in both men. Final note: If like me you are a Sergeant fan, check out his solo stuff on his website 92 Happy Customers, as well as his post-rock project Poltergeist with former Bunnymen bassist Les Pattinson.

JAX123A ,

Top Marks

Songwriting, performance, melody & hooks, production, emotion. An excellent piece of work!

A0014267 ,

Find

An intergalactic journey through time. The sound of nostalgia for those who have missed the unique sound of Echo. "New Horizons" is my favorite track.

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