14 Songs, 52 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

BABYMETAL knows something about alternate universes. Since 2010, the Japanese band has carved a unique niche that embraces sugary J-pop and power metal. They are true rock ’n’ roll unicorns, with costumes, choreographed routines, and high-pitched vocals against a masked four-piece band thrashing out double bass drum rolls and squealing solos. Their third album swirls more music genres into the group’s kawaii metal, taking listeners on a wild excursion to infinity and beyond. “Sound-wise, we didn’t want to limit it to just metal but also wanted to explore different genres and widen the range of our music,” SU-METAL (Suzuka Nakamoto) tells Apple Music. “All the songs in the album are different, similar to the multitude of stars in the galaxy. The overall idea is that BABYMETAL is traveling on a spaceship to the metal galaxies.” And what a trip. The beatific “Shanti Shanti Shanti” uses Indian rhythm and melody. “IN THE NAME OF” has chorale movements, while “Oh! MAJINAI” traipses into Scandinavian folk featuring vocals from Sabaton’s burly singer Joakim Brodén. There are also nods to digital hardcore (“Distortion”) and hip-hop (“PA PA YA!!” featuring Thai rapper F.HERO). BABYMETAL remembers to pack flammable ground-and-pound on “Starlight,” “Night Night Burn!” and the ambitious power-metal closer, “Arkadia.” SU-METAL and MOAMETAL (Moa Kikuchi) took Apple Music through METAL GALAXY’s points of interest, track by track.

FUTURE METAL
SU-METAL: “This song is the album’s opening track, and only a computer was used instead of instruments. We would love for the listener to imagine himself/herself about to board a spaceship ready to travel the METAL GALAXY.”

DA DA DANCE
MOAMETAL: “This dance-metal song is a mixture of future music sounds crossed with Japanese ’90s dance music. The guitar is played by Tak Matsumoto, who is a very famous guitarist from the Japanese band B’z.”

Elevator Girl
SU-METAL: “Just like an elevator moving up and down, this song expresses the emotional ups and downs teenagers go through as they mature. Sound-wise, there are elements of jazz as well as a metallic riff and rhythm combined within the song. Because there are two versions (Japanese and English) of the song, we hope that fans enjoy both versions.”

Shanti Shanti Shanti
MOAMETAL: “Because this third album portrays an odyssey to the different metal stars, we wanted to also include Asian sound essences into the album, as if the listener has visited this territory while on their journey.”

Oh! MAJINAI
SU-METAL: “This song is inspired by Scandinavian folk metal, so we asked Joakim Brodén from Sabaton to appear as a guest vocalist. He and his band Sabaton joined BABYMETAL for BABYMETAL’s Japan shows in fall of 2018.”

Brand New Day
MOAMETAL: “Sound-wise, this song was a new approach for BABYMETAL. Polyphia appeared as guest guitarists in the song and we feel that their sound has made the song even better.”

Night Night Burn!
SU-METAL: “This song has actually existed for approximately the same period as ‘Megitsune,’ so it’s been around for a long time. Sound-wise, there are elements of Latin music, which has added more energy into the song.”

IN THE NAME OF
MOAMETAL: “This song also is an opener, and if ‘FUTURE METAL’ represents the light side, ‘IN THE NAME OF’ represents the dark side. With a tribal sound base and with a heavy rhythm, the song introduces the beginning of the dark side to the listener.”

Distortion
SU-METAL: “‘Distortion’ is a song that illustrates a human with a two-faced personality who exists in dystopia. We wanted to find someone whose voice would best represent the opposite of SU-METAL’s character. Arch Enemy’s Alissa White-Gluz was perfect for this role as her vocals/growls are amazing and we are so lucky to have her involved in this song.”

PA PA YA!!
MOAMETAL: “‘PA PA YA!!’ has a tropical/Asian sound element because we wanted to create a party-metal song. To add more of an Asian essence, we had Thai rapper F.HERO collaborate with us.”

Kagerou
SU-METAL: “This track shows a different aspect of BABYMETAL as the song has both a heavy and midtempo sound. The song and choreography are different than what we’re used to, so we definitely explored a new territory for this song.”

Starlight
MOAMETAL: “Elements of djent and a melodious heavy sound are combined in this track. When you hear the track, it’s as if SU-METAL’s powerful vocals shine light on an eternal path.”

Shine
MOAMETAL: “The acoustic guitar and the choir in the intro and outro are the highlights of the track. The song portrays life and depicts the ups and downs we all experience through life.”

Arkadia
SU-METAL: “This song concludes the album and portrays a new departure. It’s a cross between a fast-paced rhythm with a melodious sound.”

EDITORS’ NOTES

BABYMETAL knows something about alternate universes. Since 2010, the Japanese band has carved a unique niche that embraces sugary J-pop and power metal. They are true rock ’n’ roll unicorns, with costumes, choreographed routines, and high-pitched vocals against a masked four-piece band thrashing out double bass drum rolls and squealing solos. Their third album swirls more music genres into the group’s kawaii metal, taking listeners on a wild excursion to infinity and beyond. “Sound-wise, we didn’t want to limit it to just metal but also wanted to explore different genres and widen the range of our music,” SU-METAL (Suzuka Nakamoto) tells Apple Music. “All the songs in the album are different, similar to the multitude of stars in the galaxy. The overall idea is that BABYMETAL is traveling on a spaceship to the metal galaxies.” And what a trip. The beatific “Shanti Shanti Shanti” uses Indian rhythm and melody. “IN THE NAME OF” has chorale movements, while “Oh! MAJINAI” traipses into Scandinavian folk featuring vocals from Sabaton’s burly singer Joakim Brodén. There are also nods to digital hardcore (“Distortion”) and hip-hop (“PA PA YA!!” featuring Thai rapper F.HERO). BABYMETAL remembers to pack flammable ground-and-pound on “Starlight,” “Night Night Burn!” and the ambitious power-metal closer, “Arkadia.” SU-METAL and MOAMETAL (Moa Kikuchi) took Apple Music through METAL GALAXY’s points of interest, track by track.

FUTURE METAL
SU-METAL: “This song is the album’s opening track, and only a computer was used instead of instruments. We would love for the listener to imagine himself/herself about to board a spaceship ready to travel the METAL GALAXY.”

DA DA DANCE
MOAMETAL: “This dance-metal song is a mixture of future music sounds crossed with Japanese ’90s dance music. The guitar is played by Tak Matsumoto, who is a very famous guitarist from the Japanese band B’z.”

Elevator Girl
SU-METAL: “Just like an elevator moving up and down, this song expresses the emotional ups and downs teenagers go through as they mature. Sound-wise, there are elements of jazz as well as a metallic riff and rhythm combined within the song. Because there are two versions (Japanese and English) of the song, we hope that fans enjoy both versions.”

Shanti Shanti Shanti
MOAMETAL: “Because this third album portrays an odyssey to the different metal stars, we wanted to also include Asian sound essences into the album, as if the listener has visited this territory while on their journey.”

Oh! MAJINAI
SU-METAL: “This song is inspired by Scandinavian folk metal, so we asked Joakim Brodén from Sabaton to appear as a guest vocalist. He and his band Sabaton joined BABYMETAL for BABYMETAL’s Japan shows in fall of 2018.”

Brand New Day
MOAMETAL: “Sound-wise, this song was a new approach for BABYMETAL. Polyphia appeared as guest guitarists in the song and we feel that their sound has made the song even better.”

Night Night Burn!
SU-METAL: “This song has actually existed for approximately the same period as ‘Megitsune,’ so it’s been around for a long time. Sound-wise, there are elements of Latin music, which has added more energy into the song.”

IN THE NAME OF
MOAMETAL: “This song also is an opener, and if ‘FUTURE METAL’ represents the light side, ‘IN THE NAME OF’ represents the dark side. With a tribal sound base and with a heavy rhythm, the song introduces the beginning of the dark side to the listener.”

Distortion
SU-METAL: “‘Distortion’ is a song that illustrates a human with a two-faced personality who exists in dystopia. We wanted to find someone whose voice would best represent the opposite of SU-METAL’s character. Arch Enemy’s Alissa White-Gluz was perfect for this role as her vocals/growls are amazing and we are so lucky to have her involved in this song.”

PA PA YA!!
MOAMETAL: “‘PA PA YA!!’ has a tropical/Asian sound element because we wanted to create a party-metal song. To add more of an Asian essence, we had Thai rapper F.HERO collaborate with us.”

Kagerou
SU-METAL: “This track shows a different aspect of BABYMETAL as the song has both a heavy and midtempo sound. The song and choreography are different than what we’re used to, so we definitely explored a new territory for this song.”

Starlight
MOAMETAL: “Elements of djent and a melodious heavy sound are combined in this track. When you hear the track, it’s as if SU-METAL’s powerful vocals shine light on an eternal path.”

Shine
MOAMETAL: “The acoustic guitar and the choir in the intro and outro are the highlights of the track. The song portrays life and depicts the ups and downs we all experience through life.”

Arkadia
SU-METAL: “This song concludes the album and portrays a new departure. It’s a cross between a fast-paced rhythm with a melodious sound.”

TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.3 out of 5
110 Ratings

110 Ratings

J0k3rz1 ,

look at the metal elitists

LOL look at all the terrible reviews from the metal elitists. Get a grip. This music is innovative unlke the copy paste trash yall been listening to for years

666BaD666 ,

Great band

All the people complaining that it’s not metal are pathetic

Ilum77 ,

2 discs in one!

If you start listening at the slammin’ instrumental track "In The Name Of" and continue on through to the end of the disc, you will enjoy the complete Babymetal sonic experience you are used to - and it’s gloriously infectious and freakin’ heavy! But beginning from track 1 ("Future Metal") until "In The Name Of" you’ll get a totally different album – one of pure experimentation with each song taking on a different ‘cultural’ rhythm (from Tropicale to drunk pirate metal to a light RnB to…) with heavy guitar mixed in to provide a tertiary link to some kind of metal cred. No other artist could possibly pull off this kind of variety with conviction and that’s one thing that makes BABYMETAL so special; but if you want to enjoy the ‘metal’ of BABYMETAL, start with ‘In The Name Of’ and hit the pit! No matter which 'album' you choose, you're gonna have a BLAST!!!

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