14 Songs, 37 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Earlier in 2008, Jay Reatard released a collection of singles recorded for various labels over two years (Singles ‘06-‘07), and followed it in the fall with Matador Singles ’08, neatly culling a half-dozen 7” singles on the Matador label into one set. This collection makes for surprisingly cohesive listening as Reatard continues to refine his groove, so to speak, channeling his furiously wild energy into music clearly influenced by pioneers of pop-punk. Songs like “See/Saw,” “Screaming Hand” and  “Always Wanting More” beautifully conflate early British and New Zealand post-punk into one powerful mélange (think Buzzcocks + Adverts + the Clean + Chris Knox), all clattering snares, adrenaline-pumped guitars, and pinched snarl. “DOA” uses old-fashioned hardcore as a touchstone, while the reverb-heavy “Trapped Here” evokes the moody post-punk of the Jesus and Mary Chain, but “I’m Watching You” reveals Reatard’s penchant for pure pop. It’s a wonder that these individual tracks coalesce to make a really strong listening experience from start to finish, but they do, with conviction.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Earlier in 2008, Jay Reatard released a collection of singles recorded for various labels over two years (Singles ‘06-‘07), and followed it in the fall with Matador Singles ’08, neatly culling a half-dozen 7” singles on the Matador label into one set. This collection makes for surprisingly cohesive listening as Reatard continues to refine his groove, so to speak, channeling his furiously wild energy into music clearly influenced by pioneers of pop-punk. Songs like “See/Saw,” “Screaming Hand” and  “Always Wanting More” beautifully conflate early British and New Zealand post-punk into one powerful mélange (think Buzzcocks + Adverts + the Clean + Chris Knox), all clattering snares, adrenaline-pumped guitars, and pinched snarl. “DOA” uses old-fashioned hardcore as a touchstone, while the reverb-heavy “Trapped Here” evokes the moody post-punk of the Jesus and Mary Chain, but “I’m Watching You” reveals Reatard’s penchant for pure pop. It’s a wonder that these individual tracks coalesce to make a really strong listening experience from start to finish, but they do, with conviction.

TITLE TIME

More By Jay Reatard

You May Also Like