4 Songs, 8 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Fans of vinyl will love how Best Coast’s 2009 Make You Mine 45 has translated to the digital format. They open on a reworking of The Beach Boys’ “In My Room” where a sliver of the song’s lyrics are the only original aspect left intact. Over modified melodies, singer Bethany Cosentino croons crumbling, distorted vocals as electric guitars fuzz-out into television static textures while the rhythm section holds it all down. It’s the perfect marriage of California adoration and a dedication to the lo-fi DIY ethos of early Slumberland records. “Over the Ocean” also waxes West Coast love with a tambourine-trimmed ‘60s sound. Cosentino contrasts the good vibrations with lovelorn lyrics of loneliness, creating a timeless feel. “Make You Mine” delves deeper into pre-psychedelic inspiration, this time as influenced by the era’s girl group genre. Twangy Fender guitars, handclapped rhythms, and backing doo-wop vocals bring out a bygone teenage urgency. “Feeling of Love” ends with reverberated guitars building a wall of sound more reminiscent of early-‘90s dream pop.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Fans of vinyl will love how Best Coast’s 2009 Make You Mine 45 has translated to the digital format. They open on a reworking of The Beach Boys’ “In My Room” where a sliver of the song’s lyrics are the only original aspect left intact. Over modified melodies, singer Bethany Cosentino croons crumbling, distorted vocals as electric guitars fuzz-out into television static textures while the rhythm section holds it all down. It’s the perfect marriage of California adoration and a dedication to the lo-fi DIY ethos of early Slumberland records. “Over the Ocean” also waxes West Coast love with a tambourine-trimmed ‘60s sound. Cosentino contrasts the good vibrations with lovelorn lyrics of loneliness, creating a timeless feel. “Make You Mine” delves deeper into pre-psychedelic inspiration, this time as influenced by the era’s girl group genre. Twangy Fender guitars, handclapped rhythms, and backing doo-wop vocals bring out a bygone teenage urgency. “Feeling of Love” ends with reverberated guitars building a wall of sound more reminiscent of early-‘90s dream pop.

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