10 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In honor of their late mother, brothers Joe and Mario Duplantier of French metallurgists Gojira respond to tragedy with some of the most emotional songs of their career. Epic suites yield to sharpened body blows. For every pummeling track like “Silvera” and “The Cell” there are moving salutes like “The Shooting Star” and “Yellow Stone,” where sadness and depression transform into submission and ultimately salvation.

Mastered for iTunes

EDITORS’ NOTES

In honor of their late mother, brothers Joe and Mario Duplantier of French metallurgists Gojira respond to tragedy with some of the most emotional songs of their career. Epic suites yield to sharpened body blows. For every pummeling track like “Silvera” and “The Cell” there are moving salutes like “The Shooting Star” and “Yellow Stone,” where sadness and depression transform into submission and ultimately salvation.

Mastered for iTunes
TITLE TIME

Ratings and Reviews

4.7 out of 5
238 Ratings

238 Ratings

Creator0203 ,

Total Gojira fan

I've been a Gojira fan forever. I feel their music takes me on an adventure and they have. That's a big seller for me. Stranded had me begging for June 17th. So there I was at Hastings before the door opened waiting. I really do like the album but I keep finding myself waiting for heavy hitting chords mixed with deep growling energy and there isn't a lot of that in this one. Respectfully if this is they way they progress good for them but it keeps me craving the older stuff. Still good as a unique album and hopefully after listening to it for a few days it grows on me more. They're still the band I'll skip a funeral to go see if they ever come to Boise!
Thanks Gojira!

borninwinter81 ,

M•A•G•M•A•T•I•C

The cure is somewhere in the silence..

But I'm crushed by the noise inside..

Don't lock the door on me..

Please hear me out•

jkc90 ,

We're human. What now?

With their 2012 effort, Gojira accomplished something that artists across all mediums aspire to: they told the story of the human condition in a new, thought provoking, and deeply moving way. The Frenchmen combined their primal, almost tribal grooves and rhythms with mind-bending intellectualized arrangements, patterns, and geometry. In between these two juxtaposed ingredients that push and pull each other throughout the album lies the vocals. The vocal delivery and lyrics of Joe Duplantier live in the tension between our mind and our instinct, constantly struggling to make sense of the dichotomy.

On their new, long awaited LP, Gojira have since accepted what it means to be human and ask, "now what?" From the opening cold drone of "Shooting Star," it's evident that the band have made a naked change in their approach. In a sense reborn, in another sense more themselves as they've ever been. The slow churning simplicity of many of the albums tracks show a band that has struck a balance between the primal and the intellectual, at least enough to pursue meaning in their lives. When the band does throw it into high gear, it's no longer to express the impossible tug of war of being a human. Now, it's a call to action, as expressed in "Silvera" as "when you change yourself you change the world". The theme is repeated on the blistering "Only Pain" where Duplantier laments those who "become cold" after "illusions are lost" and rally's to "take all, fear none/wake up, go strong". No where is Gojira's new balance more fleshed out than on the title track, where the band rock back and forth between an other-worldly harmonic guitar melody and one of their signature chugged grooves.

Gojira is an act pushing the boundaries of its genre more than any of its peers since the rise of Mastodon, or perhaps Metallica. They've seen a significant change over the past 4 years, but this isn't their "Black Album." It's more like thier version of "Sea Change" or "Superunknown". What's especially exciting about the band at this moment at their career is that they are so undeniably good that even purist metalheads, who might scoff at the slow tempos and clean vocals, are forced to listen more deeply.

Art that moves, excites, surprises, and challenges- this is the art we need, and not just in terms of metal.

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