11 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

The magic of Robert Plant’s tenth solo album, lullaby and… The Ceaseless Roar, is its ability to combine a pastiche of disparate musical fragments with effortless fluency. Coming to life with a richly orchestrated version of “Little Maggie”—a traditional bluegrass tune popularized by The Stanley Brothers—Plant interweaves a scrawl of modal strings, grinding electric guitars, and laser-beam synths. And yet, the vocalist and his Sensational Space Shifters (a group that includes versatile guitarist Justin Adams and West African percussionist Juldeh Camara), make the genre-defying collision of musical ideas—old and new, familiar and exotic—seem comfortable and uncomplicated. “Rainbow” opens with a ringing hand drum and buzzing guitar, rising to an etherial chorus of cooing “ooh”s. Turn It Up” combines a righteously distorted riff and jaunting, syncopated percussion. Even the most straightforward songs, like the reverberant ballad “Somebody There,” are sumptuously ornate. The result makes lullaby and… The Ceaseless Roar a profound musical endeavor, as brilliant, mystical, and difficult to classify as the artist himself.

EDITORS’ NOTES

The magic of Robert Plant’s tenth solo album, lullaby and… The Ceaseless Roar, is its ability to combine a pastiche of disparate musical fragments with effortless fluency. Coming to life with a richly orchestrated version of “Little Maggie”—a traditional bluegrass tune popularized by The Stanley Brothers—Plant interweaves a scrawl of modal strings, grinding electric guitars, and laser-beam synths. And yet, the vocalist and his Sensational Space Shifters (a group that includes versatile guitarist Justin Adams and West African percussionist Juldeh Camara), make the genre-defying collision of musical ideas—old and new, familiar and exotic—seem comfortable and uncomplicated. “Rainbow” opens with a ringing hand drum and buzzing guitar, rising to an etherial chorus of cooing “ooh”s. Turn It Up” combines a righteously distorted riff and jaunting, syncopated percussion. Even the most straightforward songs, like the reverberant ballad “Somebody There,” are sumptuously ornate. The result makes lullaby and… The Ceaseless Roar a profound musical endeavor, as brilliant, mystical, and difficult to classify as the artist himself.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.0 out of 5
576 Ratings

576 Ratings

Tricky205 ,

Can Not Wait!!!

With Robert Plant, you really don't know exactly what style of music you're going to hear- and that makes this a must-buy for me. I first heard Robert when a buddy of mine pulled out his older brother's Zeppelin album at the beach in South Carolina when we were middle school in the 80's. When I heard him cry out the first lines of Black Dog, I was hooked! I grew up listening to Zeppelin and after Celebration Day I have dreamed of one last North American tour, but I certainly respect the musicians' decision not to. They nailed that show at the O2 Arena in 2007!!! My first rock concert was seeing Robert Plant in Columbia, SC in 1989. Then, I just wanted to hear him sing Zeppelin tunes. I have had the great fortune to see him again in 2012 at the historic Alabama Theater in Birmingham, and last summer I took my son to see his first concert when Robert Played a show in Atlanta, GA. Robert's love for the blues and bringing it back with an African root-twist is simply genius. Robert is still growing and evolving as his inspiration spreads, and he is showing all of us that music should not be stagnet. He appreciates what he has done, but he certainly has more to share! Can't wait for this new chapter, and would love to see him return to the Alabama Theater!

Faunce13 ,

More Roar

The golden God never ages. His voice is in great form and as much as we want the Zep tour we will have to make due with more great solo Plant!

Botas Rodeo ,

Rainbow is simply beautiful

An old soul still pounding the pavement. What’s not to like?

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