12 Songs, 1 Hour 11 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Veteran Danish DJ Anders Trentemoller has long made sounds for a variety of audiences. Over the years he's shifted from targeting fellow club-dwellers to home theatre aficionados who enjoy the grandeur of solid movie soundtrack orchestration. All the while, he's remained aware of the fans who might feel he’s moving too fast. Lost is Trentemoller's most accessible work to date; it's the most song-oriented and easiest to follow. The contributions of guests such as Minneapolis’ long-running trio Low, Raveonettes singer/guitarist Sune Rose Wagner, Blonde Redhead’s Kazu Makino, singer/songwriter and Lower Dens member Jana Hunter, and Danish singer Marie Fisker all give Trentemoller a constantly changing set of talents to work with. Songs like the art-pop David Lynchian “Gravity” (with Hunter) and the ghostly but sweet “Candy Tongue” (with Fisker) should bring Trentemoller’s talents to the attention of music fans for whom the song is most important. Other tracks—like the dark, cranky, and apocalyptic “Still on Fire” and the spooky underworld instrumental tale “Morphine”—fulfill Trentmoller’s need to work unrestrained with the moldable clay of loops, samples, and incidental music.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Veteran Danish DJ Anders Trentemoller has long made sounds for a variety of audiences. Over the years he's shifted from targeting fellow club-dwellers to home theatre aficionados who enjoy the grandeur of solid movie soundtrack orchestration. All the while, he's remained aware of the fans who might feel he’s moving too fast. Lost is Trentemoller's most accessible work to date; it's the most song-oriented and easiest to follow. The contributions of guests such as Minneapolis’ long-running trio Low, Raveonettes singer/guitarist Sune Rose Wagner, Blonde Redhead’s Kazu Makino, singer/songwriter and Lower Dens member Jana Hunter, and Danish singer Marie Fisker all give Trentemoller a constantly changing set of talents to work with. Songs like the art-pop David Lynchian “Gravity” (with Hunter) and the ghostly but sweet “Candy Tongue” (with Fisker) should bring Trentemoller’s talents to the attention of music fans for whom the song is most important. Other tracks—like the dark, cranky, and apocalyptic “Still on Fire” and the spooky underworld instrumental tale “Morphine”—fulfill Trentmoller’s need to work unrestrained with the moldable clay of loops, samples, and incidental music.

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