13 Songs, 45 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

On its first non-holiday album release in a decade, Sixpence None the Richer returns to its trademark folk/rock sound with an older but wiser perspective. All of the band’s essential qualities—sparkling melodies, thoughtful lyrics, a touch of old-fashioned whimsy—are here. So is a knack for potential hit singles, as evidenced by “My Dear Machine” (an ode to a beloved automobile) and “Radio” (a yearning lost-love number). Leigh Nash’s voice has added a smoky texture to its waif-like tones, and together with guitarist Matt Slocum, she offers songs that reflect on loss, change, and renewal with a disarming sense of honesty. “Failure,” “Don’t Blame Yourself," and “Sooner Than Later” are tinged with melancholy while projecting an underlying spiritual strength. Sixpence’s Christian faith is most explicitly revealed in “Give It Back” and “When You Call Me,” bolstered by Slocum’s shimmering instrumental work. The billowing, slightly spaced-out “Safety Line” and the bruised but resolute “Be OK” highlight Nash’s emotional range and nuance. This is a life-affirming statement by a band that retains its youthful idealism even as it gains greater depth with maturity.

EDITORS’ NOTES

On its first non-holiday album release in a decade, Sixpence None the Richer returns to its trademark folk/rock sound with an older but wiser perspective. All of the band’s essential qualities—sparkling melodies, thoughtful lyrics, a touch of old-fashioned whimsy—are here. So is a knack for potential hit singles, as evidenced by “My Dear Machine” (an ode to a beloved automobile) and “Radio” (a yearning lost-love number). Leigh Nash’s voice has added a smoky texture to its waif-like tones, and together with guitarist Matt Slocum, she offers songs that reflect on loss, change, and renewal with a disarming sense of honesty. “Failure,” “Don’t Blame Yourself," and “Sooner Than Later” are tinged with melancholy while projecting an underlying spiritual strength. Sixpence’s Christian faith is most explicitly revealed in “Give It Back” and “When You Call Me,” bolstered by Slocum’s shimmering instrumental work. The billowing, slightly spaced-out “Safety Line” and the bruised but resolute “Be OK” highlight Nash’s emotional range and nuance. This is a life-affirming statement by a band that retains its youthful idealism even as it gains greater depth with maturity.

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