10 Songs, 1 Hour

EDITORS’ NOTES

With 2011’s Slave Ambient, The War on Drugs offered a collection of emotionally rich, guitar-driven grandeur that earned songwriter/bandleader Adam Granduciel accolades from far beyond his hometown scene in Philadelphia. The War on Drugs’ fourth full-length operates with a bigger, bolder agenda—evident in the clattering electronics and hypnotic production of the nearly nine-minute opener, “Under the Pressure”. From there, Lost in the Dream unfolds with warm, melancholic rock that combines Granduciel’s mystical tenor with a blurry haze of vintage synths, chiming guitars, horn accents and reverb-soaked ambience. Uptempo tracks like “Red Eyes” and “An Ocean in Between the Waves” juxtapose pulsing, mechanical backbeats with droning synths. Ballads, like the heartbreaking “Suffering” and the gently paced title track, float along in a beautiful fog. After Lost in the Dream closes with a couple of minutes of wordless feedback, the album leaves a hypnotic, lingering impression.

EDITORS’ NOTES

With 2011’s Slave Ambient, The War on Drugs offered a collection of emotionally rich, guitar-driven grandeur that earned songwriter/bandleader Adam Granduciel accolades from far beyond his hometown scene in Philadelphia. The War on Drugs’ fourth full-length operates with a bigger, bolder agenda—evident in the clattering electronics and hypnotic production of the nearly nine-minute opener, “Under the Pressure”. From there, Lost in the Dream unfolds with warm, melancholic rock that combines Granduciel’s mystical tenor with a blurry haze of vintage synths, chiming guitars, horn accents and reverb-soaked ambience. Uptempo tracks like “Red Eyes” and “An Ocean in Between the Waves” juxtapose pulsing, mechanical backbeats with droning synths. Ballads, like the heartbreaking “Suffering” and the gently paced title track, float along in a beautiful fog. After Lost in the Dream closes with a couple of minutes of wordless feedback, the album leaves a hypnotic, lingering impression.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
478 Ratings

478 Ratings

Real Au Jus ,

A blissful dream...turned reality.

What a delight to see WOD back with a new batch of sonic bliss—been waiting on you guys! Already streamed Red Eyes a half dozen times this AM. Consider my morning made.

mike lep ,

Tremendous

I hear a lot of Springsteen, Dire Straights, Don Henley and Tom Petty in these songs. What makes TWOD more than a revival act is the hypnotic, almost Krautrock beats, the extended song lengths and the waves of keyboards and noise. The effect is uplifting, dream-like and frequently gorgeous. This might be the only record I'd recommend to fans of the Boss and My Bloody Valentine. Best album of 2014 so far.

pumpkneater ,

A triumphant album

From start to finish, this album grabbed me. Tasty guitar licks, floating piano melodies, hypnotizing drum beats and the cathartic "Wooos!" that are yelled triumphantly in "Red Eyes." This album really does blend the feelings of sadness and loneliness into something bigger and more positive. This is an album I can press play on and just let it play. Wish they'd come to Charlotte!

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