10 Songs, 49 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

Local Business’s opening lyrics are: “Okay, I think by now we’ve established that everything is inherently worthless, and there’s nothing in the universe with any kind of objective purpose.” It’s grim to read, but when performed it sounds like life-affirming rock 'n' roll meant to crush such existential dread. Patrick Stickles has a lot to say, and he’s not afraid to bare his own insecurities and personal frustrations while he’s at it. Eating disorders, consumerism, nihilism, and the absurdities of human nature are explored from various angles. Yet Stickles can pull it off and make his point of view thought-provoking, relatable, and even funny due to his odd mix of hopelessness and lust for life. Local Business, Titus Andronicus' third full-length, isn't a concept album like the Civil War–themed The Monitor, but it's ambitious in its own right. Rather than featuring a large group of revolving musicians as before, here the band is stripped down to five members: three ragged, crunching guitars and a steady drum-and-bass rhythm section. The sound is tightened up and tough, with fist-pumping choruses and sharp tempo breaks. This is workingman’s punk delivered with a jolt.

EDITORS’ NOTES

Local Business’s opening lyrics are: “Okay, I think by now we’ve established that everything is inherently worthless, and there’s nothing in the universe with any kind of objective purpose.” It’s grim to read, but when performed it sounds like life-affirming rock 'n' roll meant to crush such existential dread. Patrick Stickles has a lot to say, and he’s not afraid to bare his own insecurities and personal frustrations while he’s at it. Eating disorders, consumerism, nihilism, and the absurdities of human nature are explored from various angles. Yet Stickles can pull it off and make his point of view thought-provoking, relatable, and even funny due to his odd mix of hopelessness and lust for life. Local Business, Titus Andronicus' third full-length, isn't a concept album like the Civil War–themed The Monitor, but it's ambitious in its own right. Rather than featuring a large group of revolving musicians as before, here the band is stripped down to five members: three ragged, crunching guitars and a steady drum-and-bass rhythm section. The sound is tightened up and tough, with fist-pumping choruses and sharp tempo breaks. This is workingman’s punk delivered with a jolt.

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Ratings and Reviews

4.5 out of 5
62 Ratings

62 Ratings

tgamer628 ,

Not as experimental but just as awesome

I love Titus Andronicus, and even though this album isn't something as epic as "The Monitor," it's fantastic and the songs are both telling and fun. Great buy

Noqueso ,

A great album

The monitor was an amazing album and it set the standard for titus extremely high. This album doesn't hit that standard but it is still an amazing album that surpasses most music.

deadnik ,

Sad to hear.

Why wait until after you just released a masterpiece to copy against me? What a let down.

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