10 Songs, 43 Minutes

EDITORS’ NOTES

1967’s Monterey Pop Festival served as Jimi Hendrix’s American coming-out party. On the night of June 18th, 1967, following a show-stopping performance by the Who, the Experience took the stage and single-handedly revolutionized the concept of rock ’n’ roll performance practice. Hendrix used his instrument like a divining rod, coaxing sounds from it that echoed elemental forces rather than conventional notation. He was wholly magnetic, handling the guitar from every conceivable angle and in every possible manner, ending the show with a ritualistic, and highly sexualized, burning of his instrument. Although the music has often taken a back seat to the sheer force of his stage presence, Live At Monterey is undeniable proof that the music from that night was every bit the equal of Hendrix’s act. The Experience plays Hendrix’s early hits upwards, sideways and down, letting loose some of the wildest, freest rock ’n’ roll in the history of the idiom. His version of “Wild Thing” redefines a rock standard, but his cover of “Like a Rolling Stone” is even more jaw-dropping, as he completely repossesses Bob Dylan’s all-but-uncoverable anthem.

EDITORS’ NOTES

1967’s Monterey Pop Festival served as Jimi Hendrix’s American coming-out party. On the night of June 18th, 1967, following a show-stopping performance by the Who, the Experience took the stage and single-handedly revolutionized the concept of rock ’n’ roll performance practice. Hendrix used his instrument like a divining rod, coaxing sounds from it that echoed elemental forces rather than conventional notation. He was wholly magnetic, handling the guitar from every conceivable angle and in every possible manner, ending the show with a ritualistic, and highly sexualized, burning of his instrument. Although the music has often taken a back seat to the sheer force of his stage presence, Live At Monterey is undeniable proof that the music from that night was every bit the equal of Hendrix’s act. The Experience plays Hendrix’s early hits upwards, sideways and down, letting loose some of the wildest, freest rock ’n’ roll in the history of the idiom. His version of “Wild Thing” redefines a rock standard, but his cover of “Like a Rolling Stone” is even more jaw-dropping, as he completely repossesses Bob Dylan’s all-but-uncoverable anthem.

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Ratings and Reviews

5.0 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

Micnvic ,

Seminal moment in Rock!

Much like seeing Elvis in '56 or Dylan in the village, imagine sitting in the audience at Monterey Pop when Hendrix appears in the U.S. for the first time. This album amazingly captures one of Rock music's milestones. But what sets this particular release apart is the banter Jimi shares with the audience between each song. Clearly nervous, he draws you in with that innocence of his, and the unfound knowledge ( on his part ) that he's making music history. Essential to any serious collection.

Chrie89 ,

Essential Listening

If you love classic rock, scratch that, "music" in general then this recording is essential listening. Though Hendrix has had many erratic performances, this is among his best. Though true he was a little nervous, clearly he warms up to the crowd and one can tell that he's so excited to be there on this recording. It's his best officially released live recording in my opinion

Thirdstone ,

Fantastic Live

This really is great. And for $7.99 you can't go wrong. Killing Floor has a great riff to it, and Foxey Lady rocks so hard live. Personally I really like this more than his woodstock performance, but that's just because I like the original trio better. Mitch Mitchell never plays a dull beat, and is constantly in tune with Jimi. Jimi even calls him "Queen Bee" and calls Noel "Bob Dylan's Grandmother" it's hilarious. And of course the famous teeth solo on Hey Joe. Must have for Jimi and music fans alike.

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